Here's Every Aston Martin Car From the ‘James Bond’ Film ...

Film Rankings with Explanations, Ratings, and Tiers

During quarantine, I've had the opportunity to rewatch every movie in relatively short succession. I've seen them all 2-10 times and have been a lifelong Bond fan. I enjoy every Bond film, even the "bad" ones, but I wanted to try and rank them. I used a scoring system to help me, but ultimately went with my gut (e.g. License to Kill MUST be better than The World is Not Enough). I thought a tier system of ranking was useful, because it really is splitting hairs to rank some of these. Feel free to critique my ratings, my ratings weightings, and opinions!

You could say I have too much time on my hands
Tier 7: The Worst
  1. Die Another Day: Best Sword Fight
- Why it's not irredeemable: For being the lowest ranked film on this list, it's not without its moments. Bond getting caught, tortured, then escaping from MI6 was interesting and novel. The ice hotel was neat, as well as the chase scene. I'll even defend the much maligned invisible car, as the Aston Martin Vanquish is quite a car.
- Why it's not higher: Personally, I think Halle Berry is a terrible Bond girl, alternating between damsel in distress and super woman as the plot demands it. Moreover, Graves and the plot in general is pretty cheesy and boring. Perhaps most damaging is the deadly serious tone of the movie, which doesn't even provide the fun and excitement Brosnan's films generally provide the viewer.
- Most under-appreciated part: The fencing scene is the best action scene of the entire movie. It's surprising it took Bond this long to fence, but seeing them go at it across the club was a blast.

Tier 6: Disappointing
  1. Quantum of Solace: Best Car Chase
- Why it's this high: The action is quite good, likely meriting the distinction of the best car chase in the entire series (the pre-credits sequence). Mathis is a good ally and it is sad to see him go.
- Why it's not higher: My biggest beef with Craig's Bond films is that they are too serious, so when the plot and script isn't top-notch, the movie watching experience is just kind of dull. Quantum of Solace takes a bold risk in making the first Bond sequel, but unfortunately it's just not that good. Greene seems like a rather pathetic Bond villain, and his henchman (the worst in the series?) ends up in a neck-brace after getting tripped by Camilla. Also, the shaky cam is distracting and exhausting.
- Most under-appreciated part: I actually thing the theme song is pretty good! Maybe I'm just too much of a Jack White groupie, but I think it rocks.

  1. Moonraker: Best Locales
- Why it's this high: I'm pleased to see Jaws making a return, as he is an amazing henchman. On that note, the pre-credits sequence with Bond and Jaws falling out of the plane is exhilarating. Holly Goodhead is a very good Bond girl, beautiful, smart, and competent. Roger Moore always does an excellent job playing the role with suavity and wit.
- Why it's not higher: Gosh it's cheesy. Particularly egregious is Jaws' love story. The theme song is terrible and Bond doesn't have any solid allies besides Goodhead and Jaws.
- Most under-appreciated part: They really go all out with the settings here. Obviously, space is pretty polarizing, but I think Bond clearly should go to space at SOME point during the series. In addition, Italy and Brazil were gorgeous views, while Drax's estate is magnificent.

  1. Spectre: Best Shooting
- Why it's this high: Rewatching this for the second time, I realized Lea Seydoux does a good job as the Bond girl, and it's actually quite believable she and James could work out, as she is the daughter of an assassin and can understand him (as Blofeld points out). Seeing Bond show off his marksmanship was quite satisfying, especially that one long shot during the escape from Blofeld's compound. Bonus points for Bond's DB10 and resurrecting the DB5.
- Why it's not higher: The fatal flaw of this film is making Blofeld Bond's adopted brother. How did Bond not recognize him? How is Blofeld able to keep himself secret from British intelligence yet every criminal worth his salt knows of him? The worst part is that it actually cheapens the plot of the other Craig movies. I believe the Bond franchise should stay clear from sequels from here on out. Yes, they can weave a great story if done correctly, but it's so much more difficult to make great sequels (e.g. Star Wars only made two worthy sequels in seven tries) than to do one-offs. As usual for a Craig film, Bond has little charisma (save for his surprisingly good rapport with Moneypenny) and little in the way of jokes to lighten the mood.
- Most under-appreciated part: The train fight scene with Dave Bautista is great! Gosh it was awesome to see them go at it, break through walls, and a priceless expression on Bautista's face when he knows he's done. Bautista is the first decent henchman since the 90s, so glad to see the series go back to this staple.

  1. The Man with the Golden Gun: Best Potential, Worst Execution
- Why it's this high: This Bond movie frustrates more than any other, as it has the potential to be an all-time great. Bond's debriefing starts off with promise, as it turns out the world's top assassin is gunning for Bond! For the first time in the series, Bond seems vulnerable! M makes a hilarious quip as to who would try to kill Bond ("jealous husbands ... the list is endless"). Furthermore, the legendary Christopher Lee is possible the best Bond villain, a rare peer of 007.
- Why it's not higher: Unfortunately, the movie opts to change course so that it's just Maud Adams trying to get Bond to kill Scaramanga. Goodnight is beautiful, but maybe the most inept Bond girl of all-time. They used a SLIDE WHISTLE, ruining one of the coolest Bond stunts ever (the car jump).
- Most under-appreciated part: Nick Nack is a splendid henchman, showing the role can be more than just a strongman.

  1. Diamonds Are Forever: Great Beginning and Ending, but Bad Everywhere Else
- Why it's this high: Is there another Bond with such a great contrast between the beginning/ending and everything in between? Connery shows his tough side, as he muscles his way through the pre-credits scene. Particularly good was the part where he seduces the woman, then uses her bikini top to choke her. At the end, Bond expertly uses his wine knowledge to detect something is amiss, then dispatches Kidd and Wint in style. Other cool scenes include Bond scaling the building to reach Blofeld and Bond driving the Mustang through the alley.
- Why it's not higher: This is one of the films that I find myself liking less and less over time. Vegas, and especially the space laboratory scene, just seem cheesy. Connery is officially too old at this point, and Jill St. John just isn't a very compelling Bond girl. I would've preferred to have seen more of Plenty O'Toole, but alas 'twas not meant to be. Leiter is uninspired as well. Having Bond go after Blofeld for the millionth time just seems tired at this point.
- Most under-appreciated part: Mr. Kidd and Wint are the creepiest henchmen in the Bond universe, but I'd argue they are some of the best. Their banter and creative modes of execution are quite chilling and thrilling.

  1. A View to a Kill: Best Theme
- Why it's this high: Is it a hot take to not have View in the bottom five? Let me explain. I contend Duran Duran's theme is the very best. The ending fight scene on the Golden Gate Bridge is actually one of the most iconic ending set pieces in the series. The plot is stellar on paper, as the horse racing part was a very Bondian side story, and the idea of an attack on Silicon Valley actually seems even more plausible today.
- Why it's not higher: It's self-evident that Moore is way too old for the part. Some parts are just mind-blowingly ridiculous, such as the fire truck chase scene through San Francisco and the part where Stacey is caught unaware by a blimp behind her. Speaking of Stacey, she may be beautiful, but she spends most of the movie shrieking whenever something goes wrong.
- Most under-appreciated part: The scene with Bond and Ivanova is cool (I always like it when he interacts with other spies) and quite entertaining how he fools her with the cassettes.

Tier 5: Below Average
  1. Octopussy: The Most Characteristically Roger Moore Bond Film
- Why it's this high: Maud Adams has great screen presence as Octopussy, and her Amazonian-like women are cool to watch fight. Bond's deft swipe of the egg was nicely done. On a related aside, I wish Bond films would emphasize Bond's intellect more, as it seems the 60s and 70s films would allow Bond to showcase his vast knowledge more frequently than he does today. Gobinda is a fierce henchman, while India in general is a cool location. The plot is realistic, yet grand (war-mongering Russian general tries to detonate a nuke to get NATO to turn on itself).
- Why it's not higher: This is the first Moore film where he simply was too old and shouldn't have been cast. Yes, it's too cheesy at times, most infamously during the Tarzan yell. Bond also doesn't use any cool vehicles.
- Most under-appreciated part: People tend to focus too much on Bond dressing as a clown, but the scene where Bond furiously tries to get to the bomb in time to defuse it is one of the tensest moments in the series. Moore's "Dammit there's a bomb in there!" really demonstrated the gravity of the situation (I get goosebumps during that part).

  1. Tomorrow Never Dies: Most Tasteful Humor
- Why it's this high: Brosnan really settles into the role well here. He gives the most charismatic Bond performance in 15 years or so. His quip "I'm just here at Oxford, brushing up on a little Danish" is an all-time great Bond line. Teri Hatcher is stunning as Paris Carver, delivering a memorable performance with her limited screen time. The plot is original and ages well, highlighting the potential downsides of media power, while Carver is an above average villain.
- Why it's not higher: Wai Lin is good for action, but the chemistry between her and Bond is non-existent. By the end of the movie, Pryce just seem silly (especially the scene where he mocks Wai Lin's martial arts skills). There aren't any good Bond allies, as Jack Wade doesn't impress in his return to the franchise. In general though, the movie has few things terribly wrong with it, it just doesn't excel in many ways.
- Most under-appreciated part: Dr. Kaufman is hysterical. At first, I thought "this is weird," but by the end of the scene I'm cracking up. I genuinely wish they found someway to bring him back for World, but c'est la vie.

  1. The World Is Not Enough: Less than the Sum of its Parts
- Why it's this high: According to my spreadsheet, this is a top 10 Bond film, while on my first watch on this film I thought it was bottom five. I think the truth is that it's somewhere in between. I like the settings, everything from the temporary MI-6 headquarters to Azerbaijan. Elektra is an all-time great Bond girl, with a nice plot twist and character arc. The glasses where Bond sees through women's clothing are hilarious. The sense of danger is strong, with everyone from Bond to M being in danger. The return of Zukovsky is a nice plus.
- Why it's not higher: I think two things really doom this film. First, Renard is totally wasted a henchman. The idea of him not feeling pain is a cool one, but he just seems boring and extraneous. I don't even think Carlyle acted poorly, he was just misused. Secondly, the ending (after Bond killing Elektra which is quite good) is rather terrible. The whole scene in the sub just isn't entertaining or engaging.
- Most under-appreciated part: I'm going to defend Denise Richards as Christmas Jones. Although no Ursula Andress, Richards is absolutely gorgeous and did not actively make Bond's mission more difficult, which is more than some Bond girls can say *cough Britt Ekland. In particular, I found her introductory scene to be quite memorable and convincing. Also, the Christmas quip at the end is quite cheeky.

Tier 4: Solid
  1. The Living Daylights:
- Why it's this high: Dalton brings a breath of fresh air to the franchise here. His more serious take makes for interesting movies that seem more unique than most. I'm happy to see this subreddit appreciate Dalton more than the casual fun does, but I wouldn't go as far as the Dalton fanboys and say he's the best Bond or anything like that. I do wish he got the role sooner and did more films. Moving on to Daylights, it's got a good intro for Dalton and good plot in general. Surprisingly, Bond's fidelity doesn't bother me one bit, as it actually makes sense that Kara falls in love with James by the end, given all they've gone through.
- Why it's not higher: The biggest reason is that the villain is just terrible. Whitaker seems silly and pathetic, a terrible contrast to Dalton's serious nature. I think Whitaker might be the worst in the series, and a Bond movie can't be great without a good villain. Also, Dalton doesn't have much charm and is abysmal at one-liners, which, in my opinion, IS a facet of the perfect James Bond.
- Most under-appreciated part: The Aston Martin Vantage is a beautiful car, and the chase scene across the ice is great! It's both exciting and funny! Not sure why people don't talk about this chase scene and this car more; it's arguably the highlight of the movie for me.

  1. Thunderball: The Most Beautiful
- Why it's this high: Thunderball used to be top five for me and here is why. The underwater scenes, the setting, the score, and the Bond girls are beautiful even to this day. Domino is excellent, while Volpe is a tour de force, oozing sexuality and danger. I think the underwater parts are interesting and novel, creating a staple of sorts for the franchise. The DB 5 is always welcome, and the jetpack use was quite cool for the time (and to some extent now).
- Why it's not higher: Some would say it's boring, while I would more generously admit the plot is slow. Furthermore, the theme song is all-time bad (apparently they could have used Johnny Cash!!!), and there is no great henchman for Bond to dispatch.
- Most under-appreciated part: Two plot ideas I liked a lot: Bond being injured and needing rehab, plus the part where all the 00s meet up and then are sent to the corners of the globe.

  1. Never Say Never Again: Guilty Pleasure
- Why it's this high: Rewatching Never for the third time, I was struck by how fun this movie is. It's exciting, funny, and fast-paced. Basically, it's a more exciting version of Thunderball, with better pacing and better humor. I think Irvin Kershner did a great job managing this star studded cast. Carrera is a firecracker as Blush, Sydow is a convincing Blofeld, and Basinger is a classic Bond girl. Connery clearly has a blast returning to the role, doing a great job despite his advanced age. If anything, this one might not be ranked high enough.
- Why it's not higher: The music is terrible. Normally I don't notice these things, but one can't help but notice how dreadful this one is. The theme is awful as well. I'd argue this is the worst music of any Bond film.
- Most under-appreciated part: The humor! This is one of the funniest Bonds, as I found myself laughing out loud at various parts (e.g. Mr Bean!).

  1. The Spy Who Loved Me: Best Intro
- Why it's this high: There's a lot to love about this one, so I get why this ranks highly for many. It is simply the best introduction, starting with Bond romancing a woman, followed by a skii chase, then jumping off the cliff and pulling the Union Jack parachute! The Lotus is a top 3 Bond car. Jaws is a superb henchman. Triple X was an excellent Bond girl, deadly, charming, and beautiful. Of course, Moore is charming and the locations are exotic (Egypt was a cool locale). If I had to pick one Moore movie for a newcomer to watch, it would be this one.
- Why it's not higher: The theme song is bad, and Stromberg is a below average villain. I also think the last 45 minutes or so of the movie kind of drags.
- Most under-appreciated part: The whole dynamic between Bond and Triple X is great. Whenever Bond movies show Bond squaring off against other spies (see View to a Kill, Goldeneye) it's just a pleasure to watch.

  1. Live and Let Die: Most Suave
- Why it's this high: Roger Moore superbly carves out his own take on Bond in an excellent addition to the franchise. The boat chase is my favorite in the series, and Live and Let Die is my second favorite theme. Jane Seymour is a good Bond girl, while Tee Hee and Kananga are a solid villain/henchman duo. Unpopular opinion: I find J.W. Pepper to be hilarious.
- Why it's not higher: The introduction isn't very good, as Bond isn't even included! The second climax with the voodoo isn't great. Bond blowing up Kananga has aged terribly.
- Most under-appreciated part: When Bond is visited in his apartment by M and Moneypenny, Bond rushes to hide his girl from his coworkers. Finally, when they leave and he unzips the dress with his magnetic watch is one of the best uses of a Bond gadget in the series, showcasing why Moore might be the most charming Bond of them all.

  1. You Only Live Twice: Best Blofeld
- Why it's this high: Just your classic, fun Sean Connery Bond movie. It was a great decision to send Bond to Japan for his first Asian visit, giving the movie a fresh feel. The ending set piece battle is potentially the best of this staple of 60s/70s Bonds. Tiger Tanaka is one of Bond's cooler allies. Pleasance killed it as Blofeld; when I think of Blofeld, I think of his take. In what could have been cheesy, he is actually somewhat frightening.
- Why it's not higher: The whole "we need to make you look Japanese" part seems both unrealistic (who is he really fooling?) plus surprisingly impotent coming from Tiger Tanaka who seems to be a competent and connected man otherwise. Honestly though, this movie doesn't have a major weakness.
- Most under-appreciated part: The fight scene with the guard in the executive's office is probably the best hand-to-hand fight in the series up until that point.

Tier 3: Excellent
  1. Dr. No: The Most Spy-Like
- Why it's this high: Nearly 60 years later, this film is still a blast to watch, due in no small part to its focus on the little things of being a spy. I adore the scenes where Bond does the little things spies (presumably) do, such as putting a hair across the door, or showing Bond playing solitaire while waiting to spring his trap on Prof. Dent. I also enjoy the suspense of Bond sleuthing around the island, while he and the viewer are completely unaware of whom the villain is until quite late in the film. It's easy to take for granted now, but this film established so many series traditions that were ingenious. My personal favorite is Bond's introduction at the card table: "Bond .... James Bond."
- Why it's not higher: The film just doesn't have the payoff it deserves. Maybe it's just a result of the time and budget, but from the point Bond escapes on, it's just mediocre. Particularly egregious is the "fight" between Dr. No and Bond where No meets his demise.
- Most under-appreciated part: Ursula Andress was a surprisingly well developed Bond girl, with a shockingly violent backstory (she was raped!). Obviously, she is beautiful and the beach scene is iconic, but I was pleasantly surprised to conclude she is more than just eye candy.

  1. License to Kill: The Grittiest
- Why it's this high: On my first watch, this was my least favorite Bond film, as I thought it was too dark and violent to befit 007. By my third time watching, I've decided it's actually one of the best. Fortunately, I don't have to go on my "Ackshually, Dalton did a good job" rant with this subreddit. I liked the wedding intro and the concept of a revenge arc for Leiter (although come on he should've been killed by a freaking shark). Also, Lamora and (especially) Bouvier are great Bond girls. Bouvier is both competent and beautiful, and it's great to see Bond choose her at the end.
- Why it's not higher: The theme song is atrocious, Dalton is so angry (dare I say charmless?) the whole time it's almost puzzling why Bouvier and Lamora fall for him, and Bond doesn't use any cool vehicles.
- Most under-appreciated part: Sanchez is actually a sneaky good Bond villain.

  1. For Your Eyes Only: The Most Underrated
- Why it's this high: I think Moore is a bit underrated as Bond. Yes, he was too old towards the end and yes, his movies were at times too campy, but he himself played the role admirably. He was the most charming and witty of all the Bonds, so by the time he got his first relatively serious plot to work with, he hit it out of the park. Anyhow, the climactic mountaintop assault is one of my favorite Bond action climaxes. Columbo is one of the best Bond allies, and the plot twist where he turns out to be good and Kristatos bad was well-done.
- Why it's not higher: The intro is just silly. Bibi's romantic infatuation with Bond is just ...er... uncomfortable?
- Most under-appreciated part: The theme song is a banger. What a chorus!

Tier 2: Exceptional
  1. Skyfall: The Sharpest Film (From Plot to Aesthetics)
- Why it's this high: One of the best plots of the entire series. The idea of an older Bond who had lost a step, along with making M the focus point of the movie, works very well. Seeing Bond's childhood home is also pretty cool. Bardem's take on Silva is delightful and a lot of fun to watch. Even the cinematography is a series peak, while Adele's them is excellent.
- Why it's not higher: One thing most Craig Bond films suffer from is the lack of a Bond-worthy henchman. Skyfall is no exception. More importantly, Bond girls are mostly irrelevant to the film. Yes, Severine is both beautiful and interesting, but she's scarcely twenty minutes of the film.
- Most under-appreciated part: Setting the new supporting characters up nicely. The Moneypenny backstory was well-done. Casting Ralph Fiennes as the new M is a great choice in of itself, but he also got a nice chuck of background story to help us going forward.

  1. Casino Royale: The First Bond Film I'd Show a Series Newcomer
- Why it's this high: Craig's take on Bond feels like a breath of fresh air. In particular, his hand-to-hand combat scenes are so much better (and more believable) than any other Bond. The parkour chase scene is one of the best chase scenes in the series. Le Chifre is an excellent villain, but, more importantly, Vesper is an all-time great Bond girl. The conversation between Vesper and Bond on the train is probably the most interesting of any film. Bonus points for Jeffrey Wright as Leiter and the Aston Martin DBS.
- Why it's not higher: There are hardly any humorous parts or much charm displayed by Bond in general. More importantly, the movie should have just ended when Bond wakes up in rehab. The rest of the movie feels confused and superfluous.
- Most under-appreciated part: The decision to change from chemin de fer to poker makes for much better (and understandable!) cinema. The poker scenes are the best of Bond's many gambling scenes throughout the series.

  1. Goldeneye: The Most Fun
- Why it's this high: Wow, rewatching Goldeneye I was struck by how entertaining the whole thing is. The opening jump is breath taking, the scene where Bond drives his evaluator around is hilarious, and Xenia Onatopp is a livewire. Sean Bean is a formidable villain as 006, and a great foil to James. Bond and Judi Dench's first scene together is amazing. Goldeneye feels like the first modern Bond, yet so true to the predecessors. Wade and especially Zukovsky are excellent allies.
- Why it's not higher: Simonova is a forgettable Bond girl. She's not annoying, unattractive, or acted poorly, but is just below average in most regards (looks, back story, chemistry with Bond, plot).
- Most under-appreciated part: the action is just so much better than any Bond before it

  1. From Russia with Love: The Best Henchman (Red Grant)
- Why it's this high: Interesting settings, beautiful women, and an engaging story make this a classic. I'm not the first to point out that the scenes with Grant and Bond aboard the train are some of the best in the entire series. Grant is one of the few villains who feels like a match for 007. Furthermore, the addition of Desmond Llewyn as Q was crucial and Kerim Bey is one of the better Bond allies.
- Why it's not higher: The helicopter scene should've just been omitted, especially when combined with the subsequent boat chase. It's just awkward to watch.
- Most under-appreciated part: The gypsy scenes are quite exotic and entertaining.

  1. On Her Majesty's Secret Service: The Most Heartfelt
- Why it's this high: James and Tracy's love story is charming, and when she dies at the end, this is the one and only time in the entire series where the viewer feels genuinely sad. Diana Rigg did an excellent job convincing the audience Bond could finally fall in love with one girl. The skiing scenes were beautifully filmed, and the score was exemplary. Personally, I quite liked Lazenby's take; however, some of his lines and jokes fall flat. To his credit, he looks and acts like Bond more than any other actor.
- Why it's not higher: Honestly, it does drag at times in the first half, plus there is no theme song!
- Most under-appreciated part: Bond's Aston Martin DBS is a beautiful car, combining 60's sports-car beauty with Aston Martin's elegance.

Tier 1: The Best
  1. Goldfinger: The quintessential Bond
- Why it's this high: From the opening ("Positively shocking") to the seduction of Pussy Galore at the end, this film has it all. Goldfinger is an all time great villain, while Odd Job is an exceptional henchman. Connery delivers a master performance, and drives THE classic Bond Car, ejector seat included. The reason I put it #1 is not necessarily because it is the best film (although it is great), it checks all the boxes of what a perfect Bond film should do.
- Why it's not higher: I cannot think of any notable imperfections.
- Most under-appreciated part: The golf scene between Bond and Goldfinger is a delight to watch, demonstrating Bond's wits for the first and only time on the golf course.
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The Clarkson Review: Aston Martin DBS Superleggera Volante (Oct. 13)

The Clarkson Review: Aston Martin DBS Superleggera Volante (Oct. 13)
Of course I will go and see the new James Bond film, but I almost certainly won't enjoy it. I haven't really enjoyed any of them since Daniel Craig took over.
I know he wants his Bond to be fallible and weak, like the character in the books, but I don't want to see 007 swigging Heineken from a bottle that just happens to be label-side out, and I don't want to see him bleed, or fire his gun at something and miss. I want him to be Roger Moore, the cheeky chappie who could speak Latin, fly a space shuttle and lay anyone low with one of his signature karate chops.
Craig's Bond can't do that. In fact, if you actually stop and think what he's done in the past, you'd have to conclude he's completely useless. In Casino Royale, he didn't notice that the woman he'd fallen in love with was spying for the other side, and then, despite his best efforts, he let her drown in a lift. The next woman he lurved, in Skyfall, got shot in the head by a former colleague. Oh, and then he took an old woman who needed to go into hiding to his own bloody house. Where she and 007's gamekeeper wandered about on a darkened moor, with a torch, just in case the baddies needed even more help locating her.
Before that happened, though, Bond went to interview someone in Shanghai and ended up throwing him off a skyscraper. And in an earlier scene, he was shot by Miss Moneypenny. I'm telling you, Johnny English is better at espionage than this guy. So's Inspector Clouseau.
But the worst bit in Skyfall came when the director Sam Mendes decided to blow up Bond's Aston Martin. So he pumped it full of bullets until it exploded.
I'm sure, to the luvvie-in-chief, this was fine, because a car is just a collection of plastic and metal and glass. But a car is not just a collection of plastic and metal and glass. And Bond's Aston is more of a car than most. It has been a part of my life since I was four. I have owned many models, including one that would fire a small man under the sofa. And Mendes blew it up so he could get Craig to do some acting. I considered at the time filling Sam's dog with bullets until it exploded, just to show him how it felt.
The car was put back together in the next Bond film, Spectre — and it appears in the new movie as well — but it was like making Ring of Bright Water 2 and trying to argue that someone had sewn the otter's head back on.
I bet Aston Martin had a duck fit when it saw the DB5 reduced to a smouldering ruin, because Bond is its marketing department. He is its PR machine and its ad agency and its ambassador all rolled into one. So I bet it really did try to sew the DB5's head back on, because without 007, the company would have to maintain a public profile on its own. And it doesn't have the cash for that.
I'm not sure it even had enough cash to develop the car you see before you today. It's called — deep breath — the Aston Martin DBS Superleggera Volante, and sometimes you get the impression that you're tootling about in almost two tons of make-do and mend. With a bit of cast-off Mercedes tech to maintain a veneer of modernity.
To create it, Aston had to chop the roof off a normal DBS, but this meant finding somewhere to put the electric roof mechanism. That meant rerouting the massive exhaust system and that meant turning the fuel tank round and redesigning every body panel aft of the doors.
The company managed it, but sometimes the roof doesn't go down when you operate the switch, the boot is laughably tiny, and it gets so hot in there, owing to the exhaust system, you could roast a chicken. There's also a problem with the interior. Astonishingly, we got four adults in it, and that's impressive, but it is almost identical to the interior you get in a far cheaper DB11 Volante. And that's not good enough.
The basic starting price of the DBS Superleggera Volante is £247,500 and, I'm sorry, but if I'm going to blow a quarter of a million on a car, I don't want it to have the same innards as a car that costs almost £90,000 less. The trouble is, of course, that when you've spent all that money turning the fuel tank round, there simply won't be enough left to do the air vents as well. Or fit a glovebox.
It sounds like I have a real downer on this car, and I haven't finished yet, I'm afraid. Because superleggera is Italian for "superlight", and it just isn't. With a couple of people on board, it weighs more than two tons. Perhaps that's why it endlessly catches its chin-mounted skid plates on speed humps. And why its tyres are so thin you need to be very careful when you're parking, even against a dropped pavement, or you'll kerb the wheels. Perhaps Aston should have called it Supergrasso.
You can feel this weight when you're driving, too. It doesn't come across as a feisty little whizz-bang; it's no water boatman. But that said, it's fast. Rocket-ship fast. It's almost too fast, because on wet roads you would be well advised to treat the throttle with extreme caution or you will have a crash. You even need to be careful sometimes on dry roads.
And that raises a question. If you can't unleash all the volcanic fury without the back end having a few moments of panic, then why not save yourself the best part of £90,000 and get the DB11 Volante instead? Because you can exploit all the power in one of those, all of the time.And it has the same interior. And it's a little bit more civilised and comfortable.
It's almost as though Aston bit off more than it could chew with the DBS. Think of its engineers as pianists. They're accomplished enough to impress their friends and colleagues, but they're not really able to put on a penguin suit, walk onto the stage at the Royal Albert Hall and attempt Liszt's La Campanella.
If you attempt to build a 211mph car that costs £247,000, you need to make sure that you have the money to pull it off. Yes, the DBS Superleggera Volante is one of the best-looking cars ever made, and it's blisteringly fast and it makes some laugh-out-loud noises from the tailpipes, but as a package, it's flawed.
Hopefully, the new Bond film will be a gem and will keep alive the aura that surrounds the man and the car he drives. But I wouldn't count on it. The way things are going, they'll replace Craig with Anthea Turner and give her a Nissan Leaf. And that, I fear, would bring the curtain down on Britain's best-loved car-maker.
In the meantime, if you want an Aston because you, like me, grew up worshipping them, then don't despair because the DB11 Volante is brilliant. That sort of car at that sort of price? Nobody does it better.
(Source [paywalled]): https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/clarkson-review-aston-marton-superleggera-volante-v0gz2qs0w)
submitted by RennieMackintosh to cars [link] [comments]

Clarkson's Columns: In Memory of Ginger Baker & The Aston Martin DBS Superleggera Volante Review

Skyfall's villains can blow this one up too
The Clarkson Review: Aston Martin DBS Superleggera Volante (Sunday Times, Oct. 13)
Of course I will go and see the new James Bond film, but I almost certainly won't enjoy it. I haven't really enjoyed any of them since Daniel Craig took over.
I know he wants his Bond to be fallible and weak, like the character in the books, but I don't want to see 007 swigging Heineken from a bottle that just happens to be label-side out, and I don't want to see him bleed, or fire his gun at something and miss. I want him to be Roger Moore, the cheeky chappie who could speak Latin, fly a space shuttle and lay anyone low with one of his signature karate chops.
Craig's Bond can't do that. In fact, if you actually stop and think what he's done in the past, you'd have to conclude he's completely useless. In Casino Royale, he didn't notice that the woman he'd fallen in love with was spying for the other side, and then, despite his best efforts, he let her drown in a lift. The next woman he lurved, in Skyfall, got shot in the head by a former colleague. Oh, and then he took an old woman who needed to go into hiding to his own bloody house. Where she and 007's gamekeeper wandered about on a darkened moor, with a torch, just in case the baddies needed even more help locating her.
Before that happened, though, Bond went to interview someone in Shanghai and ended up throwing him off a skyscraper. And in an earlier scene, he was shot by Miss Moneypenny. I'm telling you, Johnny English is better at espionage than this guy. So's Inspector Clouseau.
But the worst bit in Skyfall came when the director Sam Mendes decided to blow up Bond's Aston Martin. So he pumped it full of bullets until it exploded.
I'm sure, to the luvvie-in-chief, this was fine, because a car is just a collection of plastic and metal and glass. But a car is not just a collection of plastic and metal and glass. And Bond's Aston is more of a car than most. It has been a part of my life since I was four. I have owned many models, including one that would fire a small man under the sofa. And Mendes blew it up so he could get Craig to do some acting. I considered at the time filling Sam's dog with bullets until it exploded, just to show him how it felt.
The car was put back together in the next Bond film, Spectre — and it appears in the new movie as well — but it was like making Ring of Bright Water 2 and trying to argue that someone had sewn the otter's head back on.
I bet Aston Martin had a duck fit when it saw the DB5 reduced to a smouldering ruin, because Bond is its marketing department. He is its PR machine and its ad agency and its ambassador all rolled into one. So I bet it really did try to sew the DB5's head back on, because without 007, the company would have to maintain a public profile on its own. And it doesn't have the cash for that.
I'm not sure it even had enough cash to develop the car you see before you today. It's called — deep breath — the Aston Martin DBS Superleggera Volante, and sometimes you get the impression that you're tootling about in almost two tons of make-do and mend. With a bit of cast-off Mercedes tech to maintain a veneer of modernity.
To create it, Aston had to chop the roof off a normal DBS, but this meant finding somewhere to put the electric roof mechanism. That meant rerouting the massive exhaust system and that meant turning the fuel tank round and redesigning every body panel aft of the doors.
The company managed it, but sometimes the roof doesn't go down when you operate the switch, the boot is laughably tiny, and it gets so hot in there, owing to the exhaust system, you could roast a chicken. There's also a problem with the interior. Astonishingly, we got four adults in it, and that's impressive, but it is almost identical to the interior you get in a far cheaper DB11 Volante. And that's not good enough.
The basic starting price of the DBS Superleggera Volante is £247,500 and, I'm sorry, but if I'm going to blow a quarter of a million on a car, I don't want it to have the same innards as a car that costs almost £90,000 less. The trouble is, of course, that when you've spent all that money turning the fuel tank round, there simply won't be enough left to do the air vents as well. Or fit a glovebox.
It sounds like I have a real downer on this car, and I haven't finished yet, I'm afraid. Because superleggera is Italian for "superlight", and it just isn't. With a couple of people on board, it weighs more than two tons. Perhaps that's why it endlessly catches its chin-mounted skid plates on speed humps. And why its tyres are so thin you need to be very careful when you're parking, even against a dropped pavement, or you'll kerb the wheels. Perhaps Aston should have called it Supergrasso.
You can feel this weight when you're driving, too. It doesn't come across as a feisty little whizz-bang; it's no water boatman. But that said, it's fast. Rocket-ship fast. It's almost too fast, because on wet roads you would be well advised to treat the throttle with extreme caution or you will have a crash. You even need to be careful sometimes on dry roads.
And that raises a question. If you can't unleash all the volcanic fury without the back end having a few moments of panic, then why not save yourself the best part of £90,000 and get the DB11 Volante instead? Because you can exploit all the power in one of those, all of the time.And it has the same interior. And it's a little bit more civilised and comfortable.
It's almost as though Aston bit off more than it could chew with the DBS. Think of its engineers as pianists. They're accomplished enough to impress their friends and colleagues, but they're not really able to put on a penguin suit, walk onto the stage at the Royal Albert Hall and attempt Liszt's La Campanella.
If you attempt to build a 211mph car that costs £247,000, you need to make sure that you have the money to pull it off. Yes, the DBS Superleggera Volante is one of the best-looking cars ever made, and it's blisteringly fast and it makes some laugh-out-loud noises from the tailpipes, but as a package, it's flawed.
Hopefully, the new Bond film will be a gem and will keep alive the aura that surrounds the man and the car he drives. But I wouldn't count on it. The way things are going, they'll replace Craig with Anthea Turner and give her a Nissan Leaf. And that, I fear, would bring the curtain down on Britain's best-loved car-maker.
In the meantime, if you want an Aston because you, like me, grew up worshipping them, then don't despair because the DB11 Volante is brilliant. That sort of car at that sort of price? Nobody does it better ?
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He's not around to beat me, so I'll say it: Ginger was only the world's second-best drummer (Sunday Times, Oct. 13)
The drummer Ginger Baker died last week and everyone was very surprised because we all assumed the drug-addled wild man from Cream and Blind Faith had shuffled off this mortal coil years ago. It's customary, of course, when someone dies to gloss over their shortcomings and concentrate instead on their work for charity and their heroics in the war. But this is nigh-on impossible with Baker, who was almost certainly the most unpleasant man ever to grace a stage. He pulled a knife on Cream's bass player, Jack Bruce. He used his fists to settle almost every dispute. He broke the nose of the director who made a documentary about him with his walking stick.
Then, of course, there was the naked 11-year-old girl featured on the cover of Blind Faith's only album. That's such a difficult issue these days, none of the obituaries even mentioned it.
Instead, everyone concentrated on Baker's skills as a musician — but even here people missed the point, because despite what he claimed, he wasn't the best drummer the world has ever seen. Thanks to Mitch Mitchell, who played with Jimi Hendrix, he was the second best. I'm on Twitter if you want to argue.
Baker, however, could keep perfect time, even when he was full of heroin, which is quite an achievement. And he could maintain four different cross rhythms with each of his limbs. This is like rubbing your tummy, patting your head, pumping up a lilo and playing hopscotch all at the same time.
I have a drum kit. It's an enormous Pictures of Lily limited edition replica.
And after several years of weekly lessons, I developed a profound admiration for drummers, because they're doing something I can't do.
We can't admire people who can do what we can do. I don't admire anyone who can drive fast while shouting, but when I watch a dry-stone-waller creating a natural barrier using nothing but experience and big, warty hands, I become a statue of wonderment held upright by nothing but the tingling in my hair. That's what happens when I hear a drum solo.
A columnist last week said that words cannot begin to describe the "unstoppable misery" of the "nightmarish" drum solo. Plainly, he is the sort of man who thinks drummers are like houseflies. That they come, they make an annoying noise and then they die. And I literally could not agree less.
A drum solo allows the audience to marvel at the technical wizardry of the drummer. It allows us to concentrate on his incredible ability to get a whole arm from one side of the kit to the other faster than it takes a Formula One car to change gear. And to do it in perfect time.
It's been suggested that Ginger Baker invented the drum solo so his bandmates could have a moment to go backstage and top up whatever was missing at that moment from their lives. I doubt this, though. He didn't really like other musicians that much.
It's been reported that he called Mick Jagger a "musical moron". But that's not true. What he actually said was that the Stones were like "a load of little kids trying to play black blues music and playing it very badly". It was George Harrison he called a musical moron. And he dismissed Paul McCartney too, because, unlike him, McCartney could not sight-read music. Led Zeppelin? If you even mentioned them in his presence, you'd get a thick lip. He only really liked people we've never heard of. Phil Seamen was a hero of his, for example. And Art Blakey.
So no. Baker was on the stage doing his solos simply so we could hear how he'd fused the jazz music of his heroes with an altogether new and busy way of playing. He despised the 4/4 beat of rock and pop music, but it's possible that, because of what he did with Cream, he's partly responsible for it.
His solos were often more than 10 minutes long and were mesmerising. And soon drummers everywhere were trying to outdo him. Led Zeppelin's John Bonham did a 17-minute epic on the track "Moby Dick", and then you got — whisper this, because I'm friendly with Nick Mason and Roger Taylor — my favourite drummer, Phil Collins, duetting with Chester Thompson. They started out hitting bar stools and then moved to their kits for a drumming shootout. It's the best thing on YouTube.
And now? Well, there was the movie Whiplash, which everyone, apart from me, thought was weird — but on stage? In real life? There's nothing. The drum solo is dead.
I find that odd. There are still bands and some still have drummers, so why don't these people want the audience to see and hear them doing their thing? Isn't that like being a goalkeeper who never wants to make a save? The only explanation is that they actively hide at the back behind the bass and the guitar and the flashy vocals because they're not that good.
This sort of thing has happened before. Between 1750 and 1820, the world heard from Schubert, Mozart, Beethoven and Haydn, but since then, apart from a couple of little spurts, there's been nothing of any great consequence. And today? There's a woman in Iceland who turns drawings of turnips into classical music and there's Ludovico Einaudi, who provided the soundtrack for many of the Top Gear films I made. But that's about it.
Could it be that the same thing has happened with drumming? That we as a species were only ever any good at it between 1958 and 1978, and now we have lost the ability, in the same way that penguins have lost the ability to fly? Luckily, however, we still have the recordings from the days when drumming wasn't just an electronic nn tss nn tss nn tss nn tss and I've been listening to a lot of it all week. That's why I ended up revisiting "Can't Find My Way Home." You played on that one, Ginger. And now you have.
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And here's the Sun column: "Extinction Rebellion forget dole money, tents and yoga mats all come from… oil"
Clarkson is wrong by the way: Ginger Baker is only the world's fourth best drummer. The best and second best are Hal Blaine and Levon Helm.
Anyway, I have now caught up on posting all the Clarkson columns that ran while I was on vacation. Normal weekly posting will resume on Monday.
submitted by _Revelator_ to thegrandtour [link] [comments]

SPECTRE fan rewrite

I was watching SPECTRE the other day for the first time in a while. I felt like the film had potential to be an amazing film but some decisions were made along the way that derailed it somewhat. So I thought about how I would have changed the film to hopefully improve it:
A couple of assumptions and key ideas that I'm trying to go for here
1- A lot of people have complained about the Craig films being too "personal" and that they wish we could just see his Bond on a regular mission, so I will try to make this as much of a "regular mission" as possible
2- No Bond-Blofeld sibling rivalry, no Oberhauser red herring
3- We still want to establish SPECTRE and Blofeld and tie all the Craig films together and set up No Time to Die
So with that in mind...
- The pre-title sequence happens as in the film we got, but after the titles it's shown that Ralph Fiennes' M gave Bond the mission to prevent Sciarra from blowing up the stadium. Bond could still be berated by M but rather for his methods (blowing up an entire building block rather than quietly taking Sciarra out)
- If they really wanted to include Judi Dench's message, it could come in the form of Fiennes' M showing Bond the video that Dench's M made for Fiennes' M (instead of for Bond) as part of their "transition". M shows Bond the message and instructs Bond to go to Italy to attend Sciarra's funeral. No artifacts from Skyfall scene.
- Bond goes to Italy, same beats play out as in the film we got, he meets Lucia, pumps her for information, leaves her with Felix goes off to the SPECTRE meeting, hears of the Pale King. Blofeld calls out Bond (just for intruding, no cuckoo). We don't see Blofeld's face (not important yet since Bond and Blofeld are no longer siblings). Bond escapes, car chase with Hinx plays out like in the movie we got but Bond only asks Moneypenny to look up the Pale King since he still doesn't know who Blofeld is and there's no Oberhauser.
- Bond goes to Austria to meet Mr. White. Now I have a lot of problems with this scene. Mr. White's trying to protect his daughter yet he still tells Bond where to find her even when he knows SPECTRE "is everywhere" (there's a security camera in the room for crying out loud!). Not to mention how it comes into play later when Blofeld plays the video to Madeleine and Bond for some reason aggressively tries to prevent Madeleine from seeing the video even though she already knows her father killed himself. How I would do it is: Bond finds White, who's hiding out in a house with no TVs/Cameras/Technology, he's a lot weaker than in the film we got, unable to walk, barely able to talk. They still have the conversation about how he's been poisoned and White reveals he has a daughter and tells Bond to find her and find Le'American. However, White says he's been wanting to kill himself with his gun but has been too weak to pull the trigger and asks Bond to kill him. Bond obliges after promising White he'd look for Madeleine and leaves, then we can see that there's a tiny camera hidden in the house and we see a SPECTRE employee watching it from their headquarters, or even C himself from his headquarters.
- Speaking of C, the whole C vs M conflict is still there. C wants to "bring British Intelligence out of the dark ages" with his drones and to shut down MI6, M gives the talk about a license NOT to kill. The Nine Eyes thing doesn't make much sense (the movie never really explained what SPECTRE would do with the information they got), so let's just focus on the bureaucratic conflict of C trying to take over MI6 and bring it down, allowing C (who is still working for SPECTRE) to infiltrate higher levels to government.
- Bond finds Madeleine, tells her that her father is dead but lies to her, telling her that he killed himself. Escape from the clinic plays out like in the movie but no need for Q to be there. Bond can just show Madeleine the ring he got from Sciarra and she tells him about SPECTRE. They head off to Morocco, fight off Mr. Hinx but don't sleep together after (In the film we got, them sleeping together became more of a comedic moment which totally goes against their attempt to establish Madeleine as a genuine love interest), or at least leave it vague like Bond and Moneypenny's shaving scene in Skyfall.
- They arrive at Blofeld's lair. The meteor room scene can be used to properly introduce Blofeld by first having the cat step into from the darkness into the light next to to meteor, then we hear "James Bond...Allow me to introduce myself" (Blofeld walks into the light) "I am Ernst Starvo Blofeld" (to reference Blofeld's introduction in You Only Live Twice).
- Blofeld takes Bond and Madeleine around and ultimately shows the video of Bond killing Mr. White (so now it makes sense why Bond doesn't want Madeline to see the video). Madeleine freaks out at Bond, calls Bond a liar, says she'll never forgive him and Bond gets knocked out by Blofeld's guard.
- Bond wakes up strapped to the chair with Blofeld's head drill thing, but instead of just erasing his memory, Blofeld says he will reprogram Bond's head and brainwash him into killing M when he returns to England (echoing the novel the Man with the Golden Gun), which will prove how unreliable field agents are and allow C to take over British Intelligence and shut down MI6. Bond uses his explosive watch to escape the chair, rescue Madeleine and they fight their way out.
- Madeline thanks Bond for saving her but is still too upset that he lied to her, so they separate before leaving Morocco (there's no reason for her to come all the way back with him to London just to leave him), Bond goes back to London.
There's a lot of stuff that I didn't like about the London portion of the film, the main ones being (1) M, Q, Moneypenny going to confront C- felt more like Mission Impossible when you have "the team" out in the field too (2) Blofeld taunting Bond to "finish" him, very un-Blofeld like and doesn't achieve anything (except to make Madeleine not like Bond?)... not sure if there's much I can do to fix it without I'll give it a go:
- Bond reports to M at the safehouse, M sends Bond to C's office to confront him. The part where C tries to shoot but his gun is empty works more with Bond than M since it echos the pre-titles in Casino Royale. C then orders drones to come in and attack Bond (and taunts Bond about how he's useless compared to the drones of the future). Q (working from the safehouse) hacks into the drones and disables them. Maybe Bond can make some kind of comment about how technology can help but someone still needs to pull the trigger (like what he said to Q in Skyfall). Bond fights C and kills him. With his dying breath, C tells Bond that SPECTRE plans to blow up the MI6 building so even if he dies, MI6 will still meet its end.
- Bond goes to the MI6 building, meets Blofeld (with no scar yet) who reveals to Bond that he plans to make the MI6 explosion look like a suicide bombing by Madeleine (as he shows security footage of Madeleine strapped to a bomb somewhere in the MI6 building). This achieves 4 goals :
(1) Make MI6 look even more inept after suffering yet another attack after Silva's (and if we really want to tie the films together, Blofeld can say that Silva operated on his own but had financial and intelligence backing from SPECTRE).
(2) Once MI6 is shut down, SPECTRE-infiltrated Joint Intelligence Service will have access to all of MI6's information, including the list of all their undercover agents that Silva was initially after in Skyfall. Blofeld could say something like "(Silva) had a good idea but became distracted with his personal vendetta against your late M".
(3) Making the explosion look like a suicide attack by Madeleine will make it look as if she had infiltrated MI6 by getting close to Bond, as shown by them having a holiday in Morocco, yet another reason why field agents are unreliable.
(4) The attack will put the blame on QUANTUM, which is a sub-branch of SPECTRE that SPECTRE had been trying to get rid of, because SPECTRE feels QUANTUM has become too "soft" and has been funneling money and resources away from their main operations (echoing Le Chiffre and Greene). Also ties in with why they wanted Mr. White dead.
- Blofeld flies away in the helicopter, Bond finds Madeleine, frees her and escapes the exploding MI6. They go after Blofeld's helicopter but it seems like the helicopter is getting further and further away (and no Bond can't just shoot it down with a bullet)... until C's drones, reprogrammed by Q, crashes into the helicopter's blade, bringing it down onto a bridge. Bond follows Blofeld onto the bridge and pulls his gun out. Blofeld does NOT taunt Bond to kill him. Instead the Helicopter pilot's door opens and out steps Hinx, with a metallic neck brace (I miss the old Bond films where the henchman pops up at the end to fight Bond one last time). During Bond's fight with Hinx, Blofeld starts to run. Madeleine tries to stop him and during the scuffle she gives Blofeld the scar (sets up how he would want revenge from her in the next film). However, Blofeld ultimately escapes.
- Bond finally gets the upper hand on Hinx. Madeleine finds a gun and is about to shoot Hinx but Bond tells her not to, that he only kills when it's necessary, and they need to take Hinx into questioning to find out more about Blofeld and SPECTRE - this demonstrates M's point about a license to kill also being a license NOT to kill, makes Madeline understand that Bond only killed her father because he asked him to and she forgives him, also brings the idea of Bond seeing "the big picture" from Casino Royale full circle.
- Bond and Madeleine walk off as M and the police surround Hinx. We should get some kind of scene here to make it clear that Bond is willing to give up his life as an assassin to be with her, and to atone for killing her father. Madeleine says that as a psychologist, the best way to overcome trauma and grief is to start over and get away. Bond suggests going to Jamaica. We can just end there or have the scene of them driving off in the DB5 too.
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Let's play a game: Fixing SPECTRE (X-post /r/truefilm)

There have been a fair number of really intelligent and thoughtful critiques (1, 2, 3) of Spectre since it came out, and I think it’d be fun to see if we can pick the movie apart and reassemble it to make it great.
My suggestion follows (with the obvious caveat that it’s totally arrogant to assume that I would have written a better movie originally, etc. This is just an exercise for fun). It’s rather long. Also if you like pictures and pretty formatting, you can find this post on Medium.

The Problems

The Story

Everything leading up to the infamous “cuckoo” line remains much the same: Bond kills Sciarra in Mexico, weathers New!M’s annoyance, teases Q, debriefs Moneypenny (we don’t see the faded picture brought back from Skyfall), and drives off to Rome with his cheeky grin (he’s cocky this time around; he’s beaten his fair share of supervillains, he’s at the top of his game). He nails Sciarra’s widow, tells the bouncer he’s Mickey Mouse, etc.
At the Spectre meeting we have our first change. The leaders of Spectre are no longer faceless suits; now there are people among them wearing bishop’s robes, decorated military uniforms, etc. There are a few police, as well, but no one seems concerned.
Instead of a business meeting, it almost feels like a party. People are drinking, laughing, talking shop. Bond draws a couple weird looks, but they’re not worried. Waltz is moving around the crowd, shaking hands, totally calm. He runs into Bond.
“James, isn’t it?” he says. “I was hoping we’d meet you tonight.” Bond doesn’t recognize him. He plays coy, and Waltz shuts him up. “We’ve got very special entertainment coming up. You won’t want to miss it.”
Bond is nonplussed. He hears a few people mention their business interests—trafficking of the sex and drug varieties, who’s going to kill the Pale King now, etc.—and his hackles are up.
Waltz draws everyone’s attention. “We have special guests tonight. If everyone would please welcome MI6 agent James Bond.” Applause and laughter from the crowd. Bond weathers it pretty well. “And, to cheer her up on this dreary evening, we have invited dear Lucia Sciarra.”
Doors open and Lucia is led in. She’s beat up. The group claps politely. Bond looks briefly shocked but keeps his cool.
Waltz makes a few jokes about Lucia being the sort of woman who doesn’t stay single for long, the sheets never get cold, etc. He gives Bond the cheesiest grin and then one of the henchmen shoots Lucia in the back. Waltz is still grinning.
Bond loses it and tries to fight his way forward; henchmen are on him in a hot second. He tears through several of them, and then Mr. Hinx has him in a headlock and three dudes have guns trained on him. Waltz talks to Lucia as she dies. “Your husband helped our organization become what it is today,” he says. “But we both know how easily he can be replaced.” He tilts his head at Hinx, indicating that they have found someone to assassinate the Pale King.
Bond slips away by the skin of his teeth and calls Moneypenny on the road, while Hinx follows him. This time, rather than asking her to search up Franz Oberhauser, he demands to know who the hell these people are. They meet with no attempt at secrecy; they murder a woman while surrounded by cops. What’s going on?
...I can’t fix the chase scene.
Back in London, M, Q, and C attend the vote for Nine Eyes. This plays out as before with the single opposing vote and M grilling C afterward, but this time C is slightly less obnoxious, more idealistic. He seems to believe that the 00 program is not only obsolete, but actively harmful. M gives his inspiring bit about the value of men in the field who make the horrible call of whether someone gets to live or die. C replies that Nine Eyes will be able to see the entire world in a glance; MI6 will see terrorist attacks before the perpetrator can buy his first barrel of explosives. But a man in the field can be bought, misled, or simply insubordinate. He plays Bond’s phone conversation, then quips that he’s not overawed by the “one man with a gun” model of intelligence.
Bond meets with Mr. White and gets his lead for Madeleine and L’Americain. When he tells Swann about her father, she angrily orders him out—and immediately starts preparing to leave once he does.
Bond gives Q the octopus ring. He sees Madeleine leave, but she doesn’t get far; Hinx arrives and captures her, leading to another chase scene I can’t fix.
After neutralizing Hinx, Bond and Swann meet with Q, who has not turned up much with the octopus ring except that there have been others like it, usually found on the bodies of terrorists. Madeleine jumps in to serve as Ms. Exposition: they’re all working for Spectre, a shadowy group made up of incredibly powerful, ambitious people. Q recognizes the name, but argues it’s an urban legend. If a counterintelligence agency existed and opposed MI6, surely they would know about it. Madeleine agrees. “Your superiors do know about it,” she says. “And there’s nothing they can do.” Spectre’s leaders have bought all the right people; even when some of them are imprisoned or killed, more rise up to take their place.
Spectre brings out the worst in the human species, she tells them. And it can’t be stopped; not with bullets, not with brave men. Their leader, Franz Oberhauser, is not some lynchpin to be removed. The worst they could do is inconvenience the organization.
Bond brushes this off; he and Madeleine make for L’Americain. Madeleine is clearly shell-shocked from her ordeal so far, and takes a shower. She makes it very clear to Bond that he won’t be joining her.
They find Mr. White’s stash of clues and head to the desert by train. Meanwhile, in London, the holdout African vote swings in favor of Nine Eyes. M confronts C, heavily implying that C somehow orchestrated a terrorist attack to further his goals. C is outraged that M would accuse him of something so despicable. “If this is the kind of logic the 00 program uses to ‘get its man,’” he says, “I feel proud to have ended it.”
Bond and Swann talk on the train, but this time there is more to their conversation than Bond extolling the virtues of the Sig Sauer. Madeleine pegs Bond as a maladjusted young man who struggles to connect because of numerous failed relationships in his past. She sees right through him; she’s a trained psychologist, she reminds him, and her father was an assassin. She can read Bond like a trashy magazine.
Bond—and the astute portion of the audience—recognizes the parallels to his first conversation with Vesper. He changes the subject back to guns.
Hinx attacks Bond and Swann on the train. They beat him; this time Madeleine manages to get a meaningful hit in against Hinx, rather than being a two-second distraction. Relieved and exhilarated from the fight, the two leads get busy in their train compartment.
They arrive at Oberhauser’s compound. The mind games play out much the same way; they’re welcomed in with no problems, Bond gives up his gun, Swann finds a dress on her bed. Bond finds pictures of M and Vesper in his room.
Oberhauser welcomes Swann and Bond to his meteor room. Instead of waxing eloquent about how James entered his life and stole Daddy’s love, this time he’s simply pissed about the times Bond mucked his plans. Quantum existed as a subsidiary of Spectre, and Bond’s successes against them have made Waltz’s life troublesome.
He shows off his panopticon room and brags about being connected to all the information in the world—we see Bond blink, making an intuitive leap, but he says nothing. He plays the clip of Bond and White; Bond urges Madeleine to look away. She does, but Oberhauser grabs her face and forces her roughly to stare at the screen. Bond tries to interfere, but doesn’t get far before a billy club brings him down.
Bond wakes up in the torture room. Oberhauser notes that Spectre has a very specific policy about troublesome people: buy them or remove them. Mr. Hinx was supposed to fix the problem, but now….
“It has been a long time since I involved myself,” Oberhauser says. “I don’t want to get lax, you know? Old and fat and lazy? How boring.”
He delivers a monologue about torture that is markedly similar to the one in the film, this time revolving around Lucia Sciarra instead of the nameless Spectre agent. “There was no one inside her skull.” He begins to torture Bond with the needles. Screaming. Blood. For at least one shot, we’re inside Bond’s head as the room seems to tip sideways and Oberhauser gloats about how easy it is to disrupt Bond’s sense of balance. Bond looks ready to puke.
Oberhauser leers at Swann as he tortures Bond. “Do you love him? What would you give me for his freedom? Would you take off all your clothes and dance? Give me all your earthly possessions? Sell me national secrets?”
Madeleine maintains a stiff upper lip and tells Oberhauser to go to hell. Oberhauser takes it in stride and tells her matter-of-factly that he will be removing Bond’s ability to recognize faces, so she had better say goodbye. Bond gets the watch to her; it explodes in time to save him from further torture.
Swann and Bond begin fighting their way out of the compound, though Bond’s balance is thrown all to hell and it’s making his aim poor. Madeleine takes the gun—not enthusiastically—and Bond guides her strategy: “shoot there, shoot there, wait. He’s cornered, another one will be hiding there.” They put bullets in a number of strategic places, rather than a single oil barrel. The compound goes up in flames.
They escape via helicopter, and Bond fills in Swann (and the few members of the audience who haven’t caught on yet) that C is one of Spectre’s agents, and they need to shut him—and Nine Eyes—down as soon as possible.
They meet up with Q, M, and Moneypenny in London and debrief as before. As they mobilize, Madeleine admits to Bond that she’s been ignoring something for too long: she wants no part in this life. She understands if James can’t give it up. “I wish you could.” She leaves.
Bond & Co. hash out a plan of attack as they drive, but midway through Bond receives a cryptic text from Madeleine’s number, from which he deduces that she’s been captured and taken to Old!MI6. He sends M, Q, and Moneypenny to handle C at New!MI6 while he tears off to save Swann.
Meanwhile, at New!MI6, C is working late. There’s a prominently placed countdown clock for the Nine Eyes launch. He gets a notification from the computer—it’s found aberrant data. It shows him assorted video clips of Madeleine’s capture on the road and her being taken to Old!MI6 and tied up in a room. He tells the computer to notify police. The system confirms the police will arrive in five minutes, then informs C that the demolitions in the building have been set to a timer inconsistent with regulation; the system flags it as highly suspicious. C looks out his window at the condemned building, and sets his jaw. He leaves MI6 at speed.
M, Q, and Moneypenny arrive moments later and shut down Nine Eyes.
Bond arrives at Old!MI6 and finds the graffitied arrows to guide him. Oberhauser appears (uninjured) behind the bulletproof glass (gotta get that iconic shot…that didn’t end up in the movie). Oberhauser sneers that Bond has proven more frustrating than he could have predicted; Oberhauser can’t simply kill him anymore. No, Bond has to be punished. Oberhauser taunts him with the opportunity to save Madeleine or himself before calmly leaving. Bond is furious but only for a moment. He runs back into the building, opening door after door, screaming Madeleine’s name.
We jump to a door opening to see Madeleine tied up, gagged, surrounded by wires. She’s horrified to see that her rescuer is not Bond, but C. He unties her, faltering from nerves, and explains anxiously that a terrorist has got control of the demolition in the building, it’s going to be blowing up shortly, and they both need to get out of there.
Swann does not seem convinced that C is friendly. The moment she’s free she sprints out of the room. C follows her, looking confused and more than a little terrified.
Bond and Madeleine run into each other and have no time for romance. “There’s a bomb—” “I know, this way.” As Madeleine runs to their timely exit via rope net, Bond spots C running down the corridor. C is relieved, and calls out to 007. Still believing C to be one of Oberhauser’s allies, Bond shoots him. C falls to the ground. He begins to bleed out, and mutters, darkly, “One man with a gun.”
Bond and Madeleine escape via boat as the building explodes. They shoot down Oberhauser’s helicopter, and Bond gets his moment of being The Good Guy by refusing to shoot Oberhauser dead in the face. Oberhauser threatens that as long as he lives, he will seek ways to claw the soul out of Bond’s life. Bond is mighty confident that this won’t turn out well for Oberhauser. M and Q arrive and arrest Oberhauser while Bond throws his gun away and walks into the sunset with Madeleine Swann.
We skip the scene of Bond collecting his Signature Cool Car from MI6 for two reasons: one, we’ve already shown him heading off for romantic bliss with a smart, capable woman who gets him and we don’t need to do it again.
Two, there’s one more scene before this movie’s done:
We’re at another Spectre office party. The mood is more somber than the last one. Someone offers a toast to Franz Oberhauser, who helped make their organization what it is today, and who will be replaced, but only with great difficulty; the Spectre members raise their glasses respectfully. The toast-maker goes on to say that in loss, there is always gain, and today, they welcome “a man who has come back from death and seen the entire world in a glance. In his new life, he has taken a new name, and new purpose: to destroy the people who murdered him in cold blood.”
He stands aside to reveal C, bound to a wheelchair, with a horrid scar over one eye. “Please welcome Mr. Ernst Blofeld.”
END
submitted by chandlerjbirch to movies [link] [comments]

Let's play a game: Fixing SPECTRE

There have been a fair number of really intelligent and thoughtful critiques of Spectre on this sub, and I think it’d be fun to see if we can pick the movie apart and reassemble it to make it great. Do not fail me, /TrueFilm!
My suggestion follows (with the obvious caveat that it’s totally arrogant to assume that I would have written a better movie originally, etc. This is just an exercise for fun). It’s rather long. Also if you like pictures and pretty formatting, you can find this post on Medium.

The Problems

The Story

Everything leading up to the infamous “cuckoo” line remains much the same: Bond kills Sciarra in Mexico, weathers New!M’s annoyance, teases Q, debriefs Moneypenny (we don’t see the faded picture brought back from Skyfall), and drives off to Rome with his cheeky grin (he’s cocky this time around; he’s beaten his fair share of supervillains, he’s at the top of his game). He nails Sciarra’s widow, tells the bouncer he’s Mickey Mouse, etc.
At the Spectre meeting we have our first change. The leaders of Spectre are no longer faceless suits; now there are people among them wearing bishop’s robes, decorated military uniforms, etc. There are a few police, as well, but no one seems concerned.
Instead of a business meeting, it almost feels like a party. People are drinking, laughing, talking shop. Bond draws a couple weird looks, but they’re not worried. Waltz is moving around the crowd, shaking hands, totally calm. He runs into Bond.
“James, isn’t it?” he says. “I was hoping we’d meet you tonight.” Bond doesn’t recognize him. He plays coy, and Waltz shuts him up. “We’ve got very special entertainment coming up. You won’t want to miss it.”
Bond is nonplussed. He hears a few people mention their business interests—trafficking of the sex and drug varieties, who’s going to kill the Pale King now, etc.—and his hackles are up.
Waltz draws everyone’s attention. “We have special guests tonight. If everyone would please welcome MI6 agent James Bond.” Applause and laughter from the crowd. Bond weathers it pretty well. “And, to cheer her up on this dreary evening, we have invited dear Lucia Sciarra.”
Doors open and Lucia is led in. She’s beat up. The group claps politely. Bond looks briefly shocked but keeps his cool.
Waltz makes a few jokes about Lucia being the sort of woman who doesn’t stay single for long, the sheets never get cold, etc. He gives Bond the cheesiest grin and then one of the henchmen shoots Lucia in the back. Waltz is still grinning.
Bond loses it and tries to fight his way forward; henchmen are on him in a hot second. He tears through several of them, and then Mr. Hinx has him in a headlock and three dudes have guns trained on him. Waltz talks to Lucia as she dies. “Your husband helped our organization become what it is today,” he says. “But we both know how easily he can be replaced.” He tilts his head at Hinx, indicating that they have found someone to assassinate the Pale King.
Bond slips away by the skin of his teeth and calls Moneypenny on the road, while Hinx follows him. This time, rather than asking her to search up Franz Oberhauser, he demands to know who the hell these people are. They meet with no attempt at secrecy; they murder a woman while surrounded by cops. What’s going on?
...I can’t fix the chase scene.
Back in London, M, Q, and C attend the vote for Nine Eyes. This plays out as before with the single opposing vote and M grilling C afterward, but this time C is slightly less obnoxious, more idealistic. He seems to believe that the 00 program is not only obsolete, but actively harmful. M gives his inspiring bit about the value of men in the field who make the horrible call of whether someone gets to live or die. C replies that Nine Eyes will be able to see the entire world in a glance; MI6 will see terrorist attacks before the perpetrator can buy his first barrel of explosives. But a man in the field can be bought, misled, or simply insubordinate. He plays Bond’s phone conversation, then quips that he’s not overawed by the “one man with a gun” model of intelligence.
Bond meets with Mr. White and gets his lead for Madeleine and L’Americain. When he tells Swann about her father, she angrily orders him out—and immediately starts preparing to leave once he does.
Bond gives Q the octopus ring. He sees Madeleine leave, but she doesn’t get far; Hinx arrives and captures her, leading to another chase scene I can’t fix.
After neutralizing Hinx, Bond and Swann meet with Q, who has not turned up much with the octopus ring except that there have been others like it, usually found on the bodies of terrorists. Madeleine jumps in to serve as Ms. Exposition: they’re all working for Spectre, a shadowy group made up of incredibly powerful, ambitious people. Q recognizes the name, but argues it’s an urban legend. If a counterintelligence agency existed and opposed MI6, surely they would know about it. Madeleine agrees. “Your superiors do know about it,” she says. “And there’s nothing they can do.” Spectre’s leaders have bought all the right people; even when some of them are imprisoned or killed, more rise up to take their place.
Spectre brings out the worst in the human species, she tells them. And it can’t be stopped; not with bullets, not with brave men. Their leader, Franz Oberhauser, is not some lynchpin to be removed. The worst they could do is inconvenience the organization.
Bond brushes this off; he and Madeleine make for L’Americain. Madeleine is clearly shell-shocked from her ordeal so far, and takes a shower. She makes it very clear to Bond that he won’t be joining her.
They find Mr. White’s stash of clues and head to the desert by train. Meanwhile, in London, the holdout African vote swings in favor of Nine Eyes. M confronts C, heavily implying that C somehow orchestrated a terrorist attack to further his goals. C is outraged that M would accuse him of something so despicable. “If this is the kind of logic the 00 program uses to ‘get its man,’” he says, “I feel proud to have ended it.”
Bond and Swann talk on the train, but this time there is more to their conversation than Bond extolling the virtues of the Sig Sauer. Madeleine pegs Bond as a maladjusted young man who struggles to connect because of numerous failed relationships in his past. She sees right through him; she’s a trained psychologist, she reminds him, and her father was an assassin. She can read Bond like a trashy magazine.
Bond—and the astute portion of the audience—recognizes the parallels to his first conversation with Vesper. He changes the subject back to guns.
Hinx attacks Bond and Swann on the train. They beat him; this time Madeleine manages to get a meaningful hit in against Hinx, rather than being a two-second distraction. Relieved and exhilarated from the fight, the two leads get busy in their train compartment.
They arrive at Oberhauser’s compound. The mind games play out much the same way; they’re welcomed in with no problems, Bond gives up his gun, Swann finds a dress on her bed. Bond finds pictures of M and Vesper in his room.
Oberhauser welcomes Swann and Bond to his meteor room. Instead of waxing eloquent about how James entered his life and stole Daddy’s love, this time he’s simply pissed about the times Bond mucked his plans. Quantum existed as a subsidiary of Spectre, and Bond’s successes against them have made Waltz’s life troublesome.
He shows off his panopticon room and brags about being connected to all the information in the world—we see Bond blink, making an intuitive leap, but he says nothing. He plays the clip of Bond and White; Bond urges Madeleine to look away. She does, but Oberhauser grabs her face and forces her roughly to stare at the screen. Bond tries to interfere, but doesn’t get far before a billy club brings him down.
Bond wakes up in the torture room. Oberhauser notes that Spectre has a very specific policy about troublesome people: buy them or remove them. Mr. Hinx was supposed to fix the problem, but now….
“It has been a long time since I involved myself,” Oberhauser says. “I don’t want to get lax, you know? Old and fat and lazy? How boring.”
He delivers a monologue about torture that is markedly similar to the one in the film, this time revolving around Lucia Sciarra instead of the nameless Spectre agent. “There was no one inside her skull.” He begins to torture Bond with the needles. Screaming. Blood. For at least one shot, we’re inside Bond’s head as the room seems to tip sideways and Oberhauser gloats about how easy it is to disrupt Bond’s sense of balance. Bond looks ready to puke.
Oberhauser leers at Swann as he tortures Bond. “Do you love him? What would you give me for his freedom? Would you take off all your clothes and dance? Give me all your earthly possessions? Sell me national secrets?”
Madeleine maintains a stiff upper lip and tells Oberhauser to go to hell. Oberhauser takes it in stride and tells her matter-of-factly that he will be removing Bond’s ability to recognize faces, so she had better say goodbye. Bond gets the watch to her; it explodes in time to save him from further torture.
Swann and Bond begin fighting their way out of the compound, though Bond’s balance is thrown all to hell and it’s making his aim poor. Madeleine takes the gun—not enthusiastically—and Bond guides her strategy: “shoot there, shoot there, wait. He’s cornered, another one will be hiding there.” They put bullets in a number of strategic places, rather than a single oil barrel. The compound goes up in flames.
They escape via helicopter, and Bond fills in Swann (and the few members of the audience who haven’t caught on yet) that C is one of Spectre’s agents, and they need to shut him—and Nine Eyes—down as soon as possible.
They meet up with Q, M, and Moneypenny in London and debrief as before. As they mobilize, Madeleine admits to Bond that she’s been ignoring something for too long: she wants no part in this life. She understands if James can’t give it up. “I wish you could.” She leaves.
Bond & Co. hash out a plan of attack as they drive, but midway through Bond receives a cryptic text from Madeleine’s number, from which he deduces that she’s been captured and taken to Old!MI6. He sends M, Q, and Moneypenny to handle C at New!MI6 while he tears off to save Swann.
Meanwhile, at New!MI6, C is working late. There’s a prominently placed countdown clock for the Nine Eyes launch. He gets a notification from the computer—it’s found aberrant data. It shows him assorted video clips of Madeleine’s capture on the road and her being taken to Old!MI6 and tied up in a room. He tells the computer to notify police. The system confirms the police will arrive in five minutes, then informs C that the demolitions in the building have been set to a timer inconsistent with regulation; the system flags it as highly suspicious. C looks out his window at the condemned building, and sets his jaw. He leaves MI6 at speed.
M, Q, and Moneypenny arrive moments later and shut down Nine Eyes.
Bond arrives at Old!MI6 and finds the graffitied arrows to guide him. Oberhauser appears (uninjured) behind the bulletproof glass (gotta get that iconic shot…that didn’t end up in the movie). Oberhauser sneers that Bond has proven more frustrating than he could have predicted; Oberhauser can’t simply kill him anymore. No, Bond has to be punished. Oberhauser taunts him with the opportunity to save Madeleine or himself before calmly leaving. Bond is furious but only for a moment. He runs back into the building, opening door after door, screaming Madeleine’s name.
We jump to a door opening to see Madeleine tied up, gagged, surrounded by wires. She’s horrified to see that her rescuer is not Bond, but C. He unties her, faltering from nerves, and explains anxiously that a terrorist has got control of the demolition in the building, it’s going to be blowing up shortly, and they both need to get out of there.
Swann does not seem convinced that C is friendly. The moment she’s free she sprints out of the room. C follows her, looking confused and more than a little terrified.
Bond and Madeleine run into each other and have no time for romance. “There’s a bomb—” “I know, this way.” As Madeleine runs to their timely exit via rope net, Bond spots C running down the corridor. C is relieved, and calls out to 007. Still believing C to be one of Oberhauser’s allies, Bond shoots him. C falls to the ground. He begins to bleed out, and mutters, darkly, “One man with a gun.”
Bond and Madeleine escape via boat as the building explodes. They shoot down Oberhauser’s helicopter, and Bond gets his moment of being The Good Guy by refusing to shoot Oberhauser dead in the face. Oberhauser threatens that as long as he lives, he will seek ways to claw the soul out of Bond’s life. Bond is mighty confident that this won’t turn out well for Oberhauser. M and Q arrive and arrest Oberhauser while Bond throws his gun away and walks into the sunset with Madeleine Swann.
We skip the scene of Bond collecting his Signature Cool Car from MI6 for two reasons: one, we’ve already shown him heading off for romantic bliss with a smart, capable woman who gets him and we don’t need to do it again.
Two, there’s one more scene before this movie’s done:
We’re at another Spectre office party. The mood is more somber than the last one. Someone offers a toast to Franz Oberhauser, who helped make their organization what it is today, and who will be replaced, but only with great difficulty; the Spectre members raise their glasses respectfully. The toast-maker goes on to say that in loss, there is always gain, and today, they welcome “a man who has come back from death and seen the entire world in a glance. In his new life, he has taken a new name, and new purpose: to destroy the people who murdered him in cold blood.”
He stands aside to reveal C, bound to a wheelchair, with a horrid scar over one eye. “Please welcome Mr. Ernst Blofeld.”
END
submitted by chandlerjbirch to TrueFilm [link] [comments]

'Carte Blanche': My Wishful Ideas for 007's Return to Gaming

EDIT: Hey guys, sorry if this isn't exactly done up to par with standard Reddit ettiquite, I'd really like to present my nerdy ideas to you in a way that meets with everyone's standards so please bear with me while I work on everything. It's been suggested I put the major points towards the top of the post and keep the fluff out of it so I'll try to gear this more in line with that. Thanks for your patience guys, I'm trying lol.
What They Should Do-
So I've recently been adding all my PS4 games to my new external hard drive and I loved having my Tomb Raider games sitting right next to Uncharted and right next to Metal Gear Solid. Then it struck me, each of these franchises is fronted by their own truly iconic protagonists, Lara Croft, Nathan Drake and er...Big Boss or Solid Snake or whatever his name is (I have to admit I'm not that big of a Metal Gear Solid fan-not because I don't like the series or anything I just haven't ever really gotten the chance to sit down and play then through) then I got to thinking-one of the most iconic action franchise heroes of all time, my own personal favorite action hero, for lack of a better way of describing him, is of course James Bond. And then I realized, Bond has been tragically absent from the video gaming sphere for a while now, six years to be exact. And this would be less somber if 007 hadn't once been truly an iconic figure in the video gaming community-I fondly remember playing Nightfire and Everything or Nothing on my PS2, Bloodstone on my Xbox 360 and of course...of course, of course, GoldenEye on my good old N64 back in the day. And while I wouldn't be arrogant enough to call myself the greatest 007 fan ever, having only been born in 1991, I have seen every single film from Doctor No to Spectre and I eagerly anticipate Daniel Craig's final outing as 007, I've read at least one of Ian Fleming's original novels, Casino Royale and yet, not a single James Bond title sits on my PS4 and this saddens me.
As I'm sure we all know, 007 Legends was released on consoles in 2012-and what a disappointment it was. As such, the negative reception to 007 Legends caused Activision to drop the license for all games related to James Bond media, which helped exaggerate the recent drought in 007 games. As things stand, no one currently knows whether or not we will ever see another James Bond video game or if we do, how long it will take.
Realistically speaking, it would be foolish to believe that anyone would let such a lucrative title as the 007 Franchise lie dormant forever-I only hope that when Bond makes his return to gaming it's in a title worthy to carry the name. Therefore I hereby propose my own ideas for James Bond's next adventure in video gaming-please bear in mind that this is nothing more than wishful thinking so the chances of this concept actually playing out are quite small so don't get too excited and hopefully you don't come to this post mistaking it as some kind of a leak for future plans. But nevertheless here we go.
My first proposal would be that a different company other than Activision, namely Naughty Dog or SquareEnix take the title. I wouldn't be opposed to EA reacquiring the rights since not only did they make some of the better 007 titles under Brosnan's tenure, they have also evolved as a company to build some truly amazing franchises like Dragon Age or Battlefield-if EA could marry both the free roaming exploration and role playing elements of the Dragon Age franchise with the tactical first person shooting elements of Battlefield, I think they'd have a capable entry on their hands. I feel Rockstar would also be capable of making a truly formidable 007 series but I fear it just wouldn't be in the company's style to adapt a popular character like Bond as they seem to prefer sticking to their own franchises and the only adapted content by the company seems to have been of more cult classics like The Warriors. I would suggest UbiSoft, with a 007 title similar to Assassin's Creed or Watchdogs but I think having a second espionage action franchise would conflict with their Tom Clancy titles, specifically Splinter Cell, which I strongly believe will be returning imminently. I'm not going to suggest Telltale, because while they would indisputably be capable of creating a story that focuses on Bond's development as a character, I wouldn't be confident they would give us the control over 007 I think we deserve.
No I stand by Naughty Dog and SquareEnix, clearly with Uncharted and the rebooted Tomb Raider games in mind (unfortunately, if Naughty Dog acquired the rights, I feel the title would be a PlayStation exclusive, therefore alienating Xbox customers so perhaps SquareEnix is the best bet)
In terms of 007 returning to the video gaming market we have to realize that we are at a very critical step in the game-whatever eventually gets released as the next James Bond title is going to have an immense amount of pressure on its shoulders as it's going to have to make a lasting impression in order to ensure future titles. How incredibly disappointing it would be if we are informed that a company has acquired the rights to 007 and then we begin seeing test footage of pretty much everything we've already seen from past 007 titles. Whatever comes next should be completely different from anything that has been done before. Again, I would suggest looking to inspiration from franchises like Uncharted or Tomb Raider.
Another thing to consider is-what will the game be about. I personally feel that the next Bond game should be completely stand alone. If we try to rely on the starpower of Daniel Craig or MGM Studios we're going to be setting ourselves up for failure. The next Bond game should feature a James Bond that is completely original and not modeled after any of the EON Productions actors. I think it should be a part of a story that features a clear beginning, middle and end, the first game featuring Bond as a recruit to the agency and the final game featuring an older, weary Bond wracked with guilt. I've always suggested an actor like Richard Madden, formerly of Game of Thrones to be a future Bond candidate so for argument's sake let's envision his face as our model for 007.
Now as we're alienating the films and any previous games, what will our 007 adventure be about? I suggest the first game be an adaptation of Jeffrey Deaver's 'Carte Blanche', featuring a post 9/11 James Bond closely modeled after Ian Fleming's original character. Using Deaver's updated biography, our Bond would be a member of the Overseas Development Group as opposed to MI6, a former Royal Navy Reserve Intelligence Officer who served in Operation: Herrick in Afghanistan. Bond was born in 1979 and raised in Scotland-when his parents died in a climbing accident, he was adopted by his Aunt Charmaine and raised in England. It's strongly implied that the government took an interest in young James' education and he was therefore sent to some of the best schools in the country as he was already a candidate for field work. After his military service he worked in the Ministry of Defense until being recruited by the ODG.
As for the plot of 'Carte Blanche', it would revolve around the ODG receiving word of an imminent threat against Great Britain and in the ensuing investigation, Bond would travel from Serbia to Dubai and across the world to stop Incident Twenty. It's perhaps not the most exciting of recent James Bond literary adventures admittedly but it is perhaps the one that delves the deepest into Bond's personal and private life and I think that these are themes that should truly drive the narrative of this game. Of course the plot can be reworked where necessary and hopefully whoever obtains the game as a developer can acquire Deaver as a consultant. 'Carte Blanche' is also somewhat of a grittier novel so I think that keeping it somewhat grounded in reality would be a benefit to gamers.
As for gameplay I would advise a third person perspective (again similar to Uncharted or Tomb Raider) but with the option for first person gameplay if desired. I would seperate the game into regions so it would be freeroaming-sort of. For instance, 'Carte Blanche' opens up in the hills along the Danube River outside Novi Sad in Serbia-while I don't think we necessarily need to explore all of Novi Sad the car chase that opens the novel would be best along a long stretch of road that gives the impression of being endless. However, when Bond travels to Dubai he does so incognito and he has to blend in as he's being monitored by members of MI6. Cape Town also appears in the novel and so being able to free roam Cape Town and Dubai would be excellent. Bond can arrive by plane and check into a hotel undercover which can be used as sort of a safehouse and change his outfits and then he can travel to his objectives by car or taxi. Stealth would be suggested for most missions as the more people Bond kills, the more local police attention would be attracted.
Hand to hand combat should be not unlike the Batman Arkham games while firearms combat should be similar to Uncharted or Ghost Recon Wildlands or in first person, Battlefield. Bond should also have the ability to craft makeshift weapons in the field like a bomb out of a car battery or a shirk out of a table leg similar to Tomb Raider but the player should have the Walther PPK available on assignments. (When Bond goes on tactical missions the P99 would also be available)
The game should also have a multiplayer component similar to Watchdogs where someone else playing the game is assigned as a hitman sent to take Bond out. There should also be a hub area similar to Call of Duty: World War II but better where the player can free roam between missions. I would suggest five areas: the Greater London Area, including Bond's flat in Chelsea, which the player can use as a safehouse, the ODG offices in the metropolitan area of the city where the player can drive in and receive mission briefings and equipment from Q Branch and also flirt with Moneypenny, Skyfall Lodge, Bond's ancestral home in Scotland (I know this might be too much of a cinematic reference but since the books never really gave a name to Bond's Scottish home why not just keep Skyfall) Fort Monckton, where Bond can receive firearms training and retake physical examinations as mentioned in the novels and Credenhill, the home of the 22nd Special Air Service Regiment, where Bond can receive more advanced tactical training.
I would suggest a DLC featuring Bond on his first mission, not necessarily a Casino Royale remake but it should include his relationship with Vesper.and his first two kills. I would also include a DLC set in the Sixties featuring M as a young MI6 agent. I also think it'd be cool to have each of the 007 actors as downloadable skins for DLC.
I haven't figured out the story yet but the second would be titled Vargr and set in Scandinavia and involve SPECTRE. I would probably involve Bond vs Alec Trevelyan in the final game.
What do you guys think?
TL:DR: We need a new James Bond game and it needs to be different than any of the previous ones.
submitted by JDisselt to JamesBond [link] [comments]

I suppose I see a different world than you do, and the truth is that what I see frightens me. A deeper look at Skyfall (2012)

Hey folks! This has been my review series of the existing Bond films, beginning with Dr. No waaay back in February. I will also do a lighter version of this style of review for Spectre, which I will be seeing Thursday evening. I will also be posting a series recap in the near future that will include some fun stuff like my subjective ranking of the films (as opposed to these which I have tried to keep relatively objective), the Bond actors, the villains, and the Bond girls. Until then, please enjoy my review of Skyfall!

SKYFALL (2012)

Story

I spoke in my last review about how Quantum of Solace had moved its gaze slightly more in favor of 007's female companion, Camille. If that was a slight shift in gaze, Skyfall offers a full-on spotlight view of a character (who is not James Bond) with whom we have been familiar for nearly 20 years. Judi Dench's M took over as head of MI6 in 1995. From the first interaction she had with James Bond (then, Pierce Brosnan), she instantly became one of my favorite characters. Both the actress and the character carry themselves with a dignified poise and grandeur that solidify their legacies in the annals of James Bond history.

I love much of what the film tackles. James Bond going rogue or questioning M/MI6's orders is a plot line that has been used countless times in this series however this is the first instance in which I feel that it is truly pulled off well. Between Bond's huffiness over being shot at during a particularly high-intensity field mission (such a diva…), the dodgy bureaucratic actions that M takes to ensure that Bond is returned to active duty, and the unnerving history behind her actions involving an insane ex-agent, Raoul Silva, the audience is finally given ammunition to honestly doubt the integrity of M's character.

More than this, I love what she deals with on the home front while Bond is off attempting to ward off her demons. Skyfall brings to light an issue that has plagued the series for several years now. How relevant are the MI6? Does modern day UK need an organization of sleuths and spies to save the world? To answer this, M is brought into a public hearing to defend her departments necessity. She does so with a brilliantly moving speech about the identity (or rather the lack of identity) of enemies in today's world.

Now I do have a number of issues with the film. First, it's always bothered me that we're three films into Daniel Craig's tenure as Agent 007 -- one that began with the initiation of Bond as a 007 agent. Now, only three films later and we are to believe that he has become a worn and weary old man. I love Skyfall. I just wish it had come out two, three, or four films later into Craig's stint.

Additionally, for every eloquent monologue on the nature of MI6's relevancy, there are half a dozen instances of hokey dialogue, typically in the form of tech-speak. I like the decision to reboot Q as a baby-faced geek and I dig that the writers give him an uppity nature that compliments the playfully combative relationship between past 007-Q iterations but much of Ben Whishaw's dialogue sounds like something straight out of a 1993 hacker film. Using such classics as smugly the confident "we're in" following an attempt to gain access to some hidden file or other and the incredulous "he hacked us…" upon realizing that the cyberterrorist did what all cyberterrorists do in this type of movie.

Ultimately Skyfall suffers from one particular issue that trumps all others. The film rocks and rolls for nearly two hours before 007 finally decides to take the initiative and abscond with M to the countryside in an effort to draw Silva to them. I appreciate the variety. It's a unique twist to the Bond formula but unfortunately it just doesn't work as well as it could have. Or perhaps if it had happened 30 minutes sooner into the film, it wouldn't have been quite so bad. But at the hour and 45 minute mark, the film slows to a grinding halt. Bond, M, and their new friend Kincaid (who apparently just hangs around a derelict manor for a living) spend 15 minutes Home-Alone-ing the Skyfall residence in preparation for another 15 minute action sequence that is fun but ultimately just feels like a formality. We watch patiently as all of the minions dutifully fall into each of the traps that we just saw prepared, waiting for the inevitable showdown between Bond and Silva.

Look and Sound

There is absolutely no doubt that Skyfall is the most gorgeous 007 film of them all. Hell… Skyfall was arguably the most beautiful movie of 2012, period (nice try, Life of Pi). Roger Deakins is undoubtedly among the best to have ever held the title of cinematographer and he brings every drop of his technical proficiency to the series and produces some of the most stunning images to ever grace a James Bond film. If Skyfall lacks anything in story, it is all made up for by its sheer beauty.

The film doesn't just have visual beauty either. Thomas Newman took over for long-time composer David Arnold on account of Newman's working history with new director Sam Mendes. Newman crafts an engaging score that makes excellent use of unique scores and traditional Bond themes. Perhaps one of my favorite elements of the film is the opening theme. For my money, "Skyfall" is the second greatest theme song of the series, following the immortal "Goldfinger." Adele's soulful performance and extraordinary vocals are as beautiful as the booming band behind her. Accompanying this marvelous performance is another opening title sequence from designer Daniel Kleinman. It's brooding visuals match the somber nature of the film perfectly.

Callbacks, Recurrences, and Tropes

As discussed above, Judi Dench makes her final reappearance as M. Skyfall offers the return of two notably absent characters. Naomi Harris brings new life to the long-lost Moneypenny and Ben Whishaw was tapped to reintroduce us to Q. Other than that, the only recurring character or actor is Rory Kinnear reprising his role as M's aid, Chief of Staff Bill Tanner.

Being the 50th anniversary of the series' first release (with Dr. No in 1962), the film pays homage in more ways than one. After abandoning the long-preferred Walther PPK in 1999's The World is Not Enough (for the Walther P99), Bond was reintroduced with his PPK here in Skyfall. There is an explicit conversation between Q and Bond as they discuss gadgets. It's been no secret that Craig's tenure has been light on the gadgetry and Q quips that there will be no exploding pens in this series. Q branch doesn't really "go for that anymore." He does, however provide Bond with a small radio for tracking purposes. Astute viewers may notice that it is essentially a replica of the radio provided to Bond in Goldfinger. And the connections to the third film don't stop there. Bond unabashedly busts his Aston Martin DB5 out of storage for their escape to Skyfall manor. This is the precise model (complete with ejector seat) that Connery utilized in several of his outings as Bond. Finally, the scotch that Silva offers to Bond is a 1962 Macallan -- a reference to the release date of Dr. No.

While the gun and car throwbacks were fun and all, there is one particular callback that tickled me more than any other. In the final 5 minutes of the film, Bond and Eve retreat back into MI6 after mourning the loss of M. They head into a small room with a nondescript room with a coatrack, a desk, and some filing cabinets. It didn't mean much to me at first but the moment Eve introduced herself as Eve Moneypenny, I began to take notice. The room was set up much in the style of the old Moneypenny offices of Bond film's past. Then sure enough, when Tanner emerges from behind a large door and says, "he'll see you now," I began to get excited. Sure enough, we cut to the interior of a wood paneled room with a large door that is covered in leather. The door in particular was nearly enough to give me chills. As Bond enters this room that is a near replica to Bernard Lee's old office and approaches the newly christened M (Ralph Fiennes), I couldn't help but smile as I knew that it was the film's way of announcing that we are going back to basics. I very much look forward to all of the upcoming train fights, ski chases, card games, martinis, and villains. Bring it on.

Overall Impression

Skyfall is not a perfect film. It has plenty of plot issues, pacing issues, etc. However as far as Bond films go (and hell, as far as most films go), it is the most masterfully crafted films you're going to find. Music, imagery, acting, and so on… they all come together to create an engaging and entertaining entry. The action is riveting, the stunts top many of those from earlier entries, and the general motif of relevance and usefulness in the modern era is an appropriate one for where the 007 franchise stands today.

Quick Hits

Category Score Note
Writing 7.5 A fairly strong story with some fantastic moments for M.
Directing 8 It's not flashy, but Mendes does a very respectable job driving the narrative.
Acting 8.5 I'm actually not an enormous fan of the direction Bardem took as Silva, but everyone else is top notch.
Cinematography 10 The best.
Production Design 9.5 Glassner utilizes some gorgeous sets and locations. The world feels perfectly real and exotic at the same time.
Score 9 Wonderfully done. Extra points for a spectacular theme song by Adele.
Editing 7 Skyfall's biggest problem. The entire third act at the manor drags terribly.
Effects 9.5 As good as anything else we've seen since Casino Royale.
Costumes 8 Bond continues to look good.
Personal Score 9

Score - 86 / 100

Film Score
Casino Royale 94
Skyfall 86
GoldenEye 86
Goldfinger 85
On Her Majesty's Secret Service 82
The Spy Who Loved Me 80
The World is Not Enough 79
From Russia With Love 76
The Living Daylights 75
You Only Live Twice 73
License to Kill 72
Dr. No 70
The Man with the Golden Gun 68
Quantum of Solace 68
Tomorrow Never Dies 68
Live and Let Die 66
Thunderball 61
A View to a Kill 59
Moonraker 59
For Your Eyes Only 55
Octopussy 48
Diamonds Are Forever 37
Die Another Day 30

Bonus Category!

So for each movie my wife and I will be enjoying a spirit or cocktail that relates to the film. We sort of did our own thing for Skyfall. Knowing that it was our last film in the series, we elected to send 007 off with another martini. We essentially made Vesper Martinis except we added a little plum wine as a way to jazz it up a bit in honor of Mr. Bond's trip to Singapore.

• 3 measures Gordon's Gin
• 1 measure vodka
• 1/2 measure Cocchi Americano vermouth
• 1/2 measure plum wine

Shake over ice.

So what do you folks think? How does Skyfall fare in your opinion?

submitted by sdsachs to TrueFilm [link] [comments]

I finally saw SPECTRE...then went ahead and wrote a better version of the script.

*SOME SPOILERS AHEAD**
Well, I was traveling for a few months and FINALLY saw SPECTRE. I was so damn disappointed in the movie I decided I should rewrite it (in summary form) and make it better. Honestly, SPECTRE is the Bond movie I've been waiting for for decades, and now that it's out, it missed basically every important theme that movies about the SPECTRE organization are known for.
Here’s another way Spectre should have gone:
INTRODUCTION We open with a recap sequence of James Bond trying to break Vesper out of the submerged elevator in Venice. She stares at him as she gulps water.
James Bond wakes up submerged in water. He is disoriented for a split second, then sits up and splashes all over. Looking around…he is in his bathtub at home in London. He had fallen asleep in the tub.
Cut to James wearing a bathrobe and shaving. He hasn’t dreamt about Vesper in a long time, but something is nagging at him.
Voices play in his head:
Vesper: “Does everyone have a tell?” Bond: “Yes, everyone…except you.” M (Judie Dench): “She was blackmailed by the organization behind Le Chiffre. Sometimes we’re so focused on our enemies, we forget to watch our friends…” M (Judie Dench): “Well I suppose it’s…too late to make a run for it…” Bond: “I’m game if you are.” M (Judie Dench): “Well I did get one thing right….”
Bell at his door. He wipes his face.
Answering the door, it’s a delivery man with certified mail. Bond signs for it and takes it. It’s a package addressed to him directly from the former M who had died in his arms a few weeks earlier.
Opening the package, it’s a thumbdrive.
On the thumb drive, Bond finds a video message. It’s from M herself.
M (Judie Dench): “Bond, if you’re watching this, Silver has gotten the best of me. I don’t have much time so I’ll cut to the chase. There is no one else I trust with this information. There is something deeply wrong in the world. So many unanswered questions. How did Silver hack into our systems so easily? Who was bankrolling Le Chiffre? Unexplained bribery of otherwise trustworthy agents. Assassinations with no trace. Bond, you have, until now, been a precise instrument of the British government, focused on one person. Now, I need you to look at the bigger picture with me. There is a common thread. Someone named the Pale King. Find this man, and go deeper. I say again. Trust no one. Not even the new M. Good day, Bond. Good luck.”
Bond opens the first file. As he looks, he hears the rotary of a helicopter in the background. Within a few seconds, a spotlight shines at him through his window. Almost instantly, Bond throws himself to the floor as the windows erupt in machine-gun fire.
Queue action sequence where Bond barely gets out alive. Somehow, he survives the Helicopter gatling gun, but a monster of a henchman swings into the apartment to verify his death. Bond tries to fight him in nothing but his bathrobe, but is quickly outclassed. Somehow, he manages to barricade himself in his bathroom, but not before seeing a symbol on the ring of the hand of his attacker. He’s trying to put together a plan, when the pounding on his bathroom door stops. The man has gotten back onto the Helicopter and is flying away. Suddenly, police and special agents are swarming his Condo. He watches as the helicopter disappears into the sunrise.
Quickly, he finds a piece of paper and pencil, and draws the symbol he saw. It is an octopus. The octopus melts into the intro.
ROLL INTRO SONG
Bond is sitting in M’s office. M tells him that the Helicopter somehow disappeared shortly after the encounter at his apartment. He is flabbergasted. M is frustrated that the previous M left him very little information to go on regarding Bond’s previous missions. Why would someone go directly after him? Bond answers coyly. He will not reveal the previous M’s video request.
M responds to Bond’s vagueness with an ultimatum: “007, you and I are going to have to trust one another if we are to continue this relationship. I have seen what you can do, but I still don’t know what kind of man you are.”
M then segues into revealing the latest co-effort between the British Government and its allies: a joint intelligence network between over a hundred countries all over the world.
Bond is loudly (and uncharacteristically) skeptical. M defends the merits of the program to Bond, talking about the modernization of the times. Bond takes it personally. He liked the previous M better. M interprets Bond’s brashness as shock from the helicopter attack.
The conversation results in M suspending Bond until he recovers from the attack. Bond has no intention of any such thing. Bond doesn’t trust M. M clearly doesn’t trust Bond.
(It’s clear now that the movie is based on trust. Who can trust whom? How do you know if someone is lying? BOOM. Clear setup for battling an organization that is based on inserting influential people into high positions of power.)
Bond leaves M’s office and asks Money Penny about the new intelligence system. Money Penny directs Bond to visit Q.
At Q’s, Bond convinces Q to take a look at the new system. Q is there with his new assistant who is an expert on the system. The expert talks about all the latest AI tech behind it, and how it has access to nodes all over the world. Q knows about it and has access to it, but hasn’t taken a close look yet. As they investigate together, Q is surprised and dismayed by how detailed and unsecured the system is. The system is inappropriate for proper intelligence. Q’s assistant defends the systems integrity and cites his own credentials to back it up. Q hums and haws over it while Bond scans the octopus symbol into the search. No results appear. Then he runs a search on “the Pale King”. The term turns up only one name: “L’Americain, Tunisia.”
Q gives Bond a watch, and denies him the car due to his recent suspension. Q reminds Bond that if he leaves, he will have no backup, no support from MI-6. Bond leaves.
Cut to Tunisia.
Bond finds L’Americain—it is a hotel. He tries to rent a room, but the concierge will not rent him one. They keep saying the hotel is full, but he can clearly see that there are many available keys in the room boxes behind him. Before long, Bond figures out that the concierge is not actually the real concierge. He quickly fights and knocks the guy out. The real concierge is dead on the floor behind the counter at the spy’s feet. In looking at the room key boxes, there is only one key missing. The room on the top floor.
Reaching the top floor, he steps out of the elevator and nearly runs into the maid, pushing a cart into the elevator. As the doors close again, he sees one room at the end of the hall with the door ajar. Bond creeps up on the door and looks inside. The room is ransacked. He walks inside carefully with his gun drawn. There appears to be no-one there.
Looking around, he notices a mouse running along a wall. The mouse disappears into a hole. He breaks open the wall to reveal a hidden room.
Inside the room is a bunch of evidence of surveillance of him and Vesper during the events of Casino Royale. He finds a bunch of pictures of a young girl. One of the pictures has someone he recognizes in it. It is Mr. White, standing with the young girl, holding fish. The label on the picture says “At the cabin, 1989. Lake Weiss, AUS”.
The maid shows up behind Bond. She tries to kill him but misses. He grabs her and asks her who she works for. She bites a cyanide pill and dies.
He hears cars and shouting outside. More enemy agents. How are they finding him so fast? Where are they all coming from?
The man-monster is there, looking up at him. Queue a second fight scene with the big man. Bond is again outclassed, but slightly less this time. At least he’s not in a bathrobe. Bond is clear that he has no backup. The hotel gets set on fire and explodes (no more evidence of what Bond found for the bad guys). He runs from the big man and hijacks a motorcycle.
Bond calls Money Penny and asks for the location of a safe house. She gives him one, but not before berating him for breaking his orders (again.) He barely escapes notice and holes up in the safe house for a few days.
Upon leaving the safe house, he begins to suspect that he can’t go anywhere without his movements being tracked. Somehow, people are following him. He hops aboard a boat headed for Europe.
Cut to Lake Weiss in Austria. Bond finds a cabin with Mr. White in it. Mr. White tells him he’s dying due to exposure, and reveals the true nature of the Octopus symbol to Bond. It is SPECTRE, a powerful organization. Tells him he’s a “kite flying in a hurricane.”
Bond gets Mr. White to reveal a way to get into the organization–through his ex-wife, who is an accountant for the organization.
Bond finds Mr. White’s Ex-Wife in Geneva, who is a smart accountant. Madeleine (Monica Bellucci) indeed does work for SPECTRE, but is a mid-level employee. She tells him it’s a charity organization. She pulls him into the shower unexpectedly and turns it on. Bond shows her video of her father and tries to convinces her that SPECTRE is not a charity organization, but a terrorist one. Before he’s able to go further, she hushes him and pulls him into the shower. She turns it on.
As they are getting wet, she reveals that she already knows this, and is well versed in the spy world. But, she is trying to figure out how to bring down the organization from the inside. Bond and her are clearly aligned in motivation (we think…but she might not! Remember we’re dealing with a theme of Distrust here!)
She’s wearing a white see-through blouse (soaked from the water). Bond makes a remark about it before getting slapped. She smiles, however, and gives him a sexist zinger back.
Madeleine gives him a location of where the big meetings of SPECTRE are held, but says that he’ll have to figure out his own way in.
Queue really awesome heist/break-in sequence, showing the elaborate way that SPECTRE members have to go through to get into the secret meeting hall. Everyone has to wear a mask. No real identities are given.
Bond finally gets into the SPECTRE meeting where he overhears a discussion on an intelligence network that they are exploiting. He knows it is the one that M referred to. Now he thinks that M is working with SPECTRE.
At the head of the table is a man who is clearly in charge. He is shrouded in complete darkness and nobody can make the person out. After a while, the person interrupts the meeting to have a guy executed, no sweat, because that’s the kind of power he wields.
The guy in charge also passes along a message that there is a spy in their midst. Everyone looks at Bond. This scene is an homage to the “Eyes Wide Shut” scene with Tom Cruise where he gets outed at the sex club.
IMPORTANT: We never hear the voice of the guy in charge in this scene. He is an enigma. A ghost. An undetermined power. Bond is no match for him.
Bond makes his escape from the meeting room by throwing his watch bomb down.
Another action sequence with Bond fighting a bunch of dudes, getting back to Madeleine’s place, and getting her out of Geneva. She is nervous that they will track her down and kill her. Bond swears to her that it will never happen on his watch. He’s made this promise once before, but this time he means it. They find another safe house and have sex. Hot, steamy, sex. With lots of sweat and great lighting. She’s an older woman. She knows what she wants and how to get it from him.
Back in London, Bond takes Madeleine with him to headquarters and both are immediately arrested. She’s taken away, and he is detained in a cell. M visits him and gives him a lecture on trust again, threatening to not only take away his license to kill, but to lock him up where nobody would ever find him again.
Bond convinces M to trust him one more time, and examine the “Intelligence Network” more closely. They both go to Q’s office. M, Q, and Bond finally discover the extent to which SPECTRE’s reach really is. They have access to the entire intelligence mainframe of all the major NATO countries. Q wonders where his assistant is. The assistant is gone.
Q proceeds to work on shutting down the system. He finds that he needs a security key that changes every 30 seconds. There must be an organization member with access? Bond remembers that Madeleine is in the building. They all rush to find Madeleine, but find that she’s just been taken out of the building. M is furious. Bond takes the Aston Martin from Q’s garage and rushes down the streets of London. He catches up to the limousine carrying Madeleine to Heathrow’s private airplane section. There is a helicopter waiting to take off with her.
Bond rushes in, switches on his car sidewinders and blows the shit out of the helicopter. Madeleine, Q’s assistant, and the Man Monster are all there. Queue the Bond action music. Man monster has a gatling gun and sprays the Aston Martin. Bond doesn’t give a fuck any more and drives the AM into him, crushing him against the wall of the hangar. (queue applause)
Q’s assistant uses Madeleine as a human shield, claiming that there is no way to stop what is happening. SPECTER is everywhere. The world is theirs. As he talks, he points the gun at Bond to kill him. Madeleine bumps his arm and ducks. Bond shoots him in the head.
Bond rushes over and grabs Madeleine. He asks her if she has the verification codes he needs. She hands him a digital readout from Q’s assistant’s coat.
Bond makes a call to Q and gives him the current code. Q puts it in and starts to work. Soon, Q starts talking
Q: “Deployment halted. I’m deleting the network piggyback algorithms. Good work, Bond. This will take a few days, but I believe we have it.”
Bond stands there with his hand on his phone. He turns to look at Madeleine. As he turns, he says
Bond: “Looks like the organization is….being disorganized.”
She is gone. There’s no trace of her. Bond looks around, confused.
Cut to Madeleine. She is on her phone.
Madeleine: “Did you get what you needed before it went down?” …. Madeleine: “Well, it will have to do, won’t it?” …. Madeleine: “Yes, tell him…I will take care of Bond.”
Pan the camera around her until it shows the back of her neck. Her hair has always been worn down until now. On the back of her neck is a tattoo…of the SPECTRE OCTOPUS. DUN DUN DUN.
Well this was fun. Totally not official and probably full of plot holes, but I think it’s way better than the totally bland version on screen right now.
Some key notes that I think should have been visited: - The guy in charge of SPECTRE should not have been revealed. - Trust issues are super important in this movie. - Less exposition and show how pervasive SPECTRE actually is. - James Bond does NOT defeat SPECTRE in one movie. They are an organization. We need at LEAST 2 movies to find out who the head of it is.
My 2 cents. :/
submitted by eisakn to movies [link] [comments]

rt, james bond rt

Respect MI6 Agent 007, James Bond!

“Three men were found dead on the Orient Express train at Trieste. One of them was Grant. What have you got to say about that, Number Five?”

“It was Klebb's choice. Her people failed.”

“It was your plan they followed implicitly.”

“Impossible. It was perfect.”

“Except for one thing: they were dealing with Bond.”

Featuring a loose cannon MI6 operative with the skills, gadgets, and good looks to charm, deceive, and fight his way past megalomaniacal supervillains hell-bent on world domination, Ian Fleming’s James Bond character has transformed over the years from an espionage flight of fancy into a legend of storytelling and an institution of cinema, with 24 films to date produced by Eon Productions, beginning with the legendary Albert Broccoli and Harry Saltzman.
James Bond isn’t just a character, he’s his own archetype- the suave, seductive but deadly secret agent, every bit as capable of effortlessly navigating the world’s high-class elite as he is single-handedly storming a military compound. His gadgets, his weapons, his suits, his cars, his opening themes, his leading actors, his main antagonists, his women, everything the James Bond franchise has created over fifty years has transformed the series and main character into one of the most beloved fictional characters of the United Kingdom and a juggernaut of worldwide entertainment.
For this RT, we’ll be focusing on the films only, and separating them by actor to allow for varied prompts or an overall composite approach. This RT will be updated when and if new Bond films become legally available for purchase.
Note: This RT does not include feats for the 1967 version of Casino Royale starring David Niven or the 1983 remake of Thunderball titled Never Say Never Again starring Sean Connery, as both films are non-canon.

Sean Connery: 1962-1967, 1971

Featured in Dr. No, From Russia With Love, Goldfinger, Thunderball, You Only Live Twice, and Diamonds Are Forever

“My dear girl, there are some things that just aren’t done, such as drinking Dom Perignon ‘53 above the temperature of 38 degrees Fahrenheit. That’s as bad as listening to the Beatles without earmuffs.”

Overview here
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George Lazenby: 1969

Featured in On Her Majesty’s Secret Service

“This never happened to the other fellow.”

Overview here
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Roger Moore: 1972-1985

Featured in Live And Let Die, The Man With The Golden Gun, The Spy Who Loved Me, Moonraker, For Your Eyes Only, Octopussy, and A View To A Kill

“Quote”

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Timothy Dalton: 1986-1994

Featured in The Living Daylights and License to Kill

“Quote”

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Pierce Brosnan: 1994-2004

Featured in Goldeneye, Tomorrow Never Dies, The World Is Not Enough, and Die Another Day

“Quote”

Overview here
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Daniel Craig: 2005-Present

Featured in Casino Royale, Quantum of Solace, Skyfall, and Spectre

“Quote”

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JAMES BOND WILL RETURN

submitted by FreestyleKneepad to freestylekneepad [link] [comments]

James Bond Shows His Softer Side (Casino Royale Shower ... James Bond Casino Royale battle on airport - YouTube Casino Royale (2006) 720p Ford Mondeo and James Bond - YouTube Casino Royale - 1080p - Bond meets Vesper - YouTube Casino Royale (2006) - L'Aston Martin DBS de James Bond ... James Bond Cars Gadgets Through Time - YouTube James Bond Casino Royale Aston Martin DBS, failed flip ... Casino Royale Movie CLIP - Parkour Chase (2006) HD - YouTube

While being the most recognized Bond car, it's actually only been featured in seven films (Goldfinger, Thunderball, GoldenEye, Tomorrow Never Dies, Casino Royale, and a nod to the Goldfinger version in Skyfall, and Spectre). Aston Martin DB Mark III - Featured in the novel Goldfinger. While referred to as a "DB III", the "DB3" was a car ... This is the car most would picture when imagining James Bond behind a wheel, and Daniel Craig's 007 came into possession of one during Casino Royale as part of his gambling winnings. The DB5 later resurfaced in Skyfall when Bond and M needed a retro ride to Scotland, and the car is front and center of the No Time To Die trailer. Well the wait is over with pictures from the set of Casino Royale of Bond’s new motor. Aston Martin, Lotus, BMW and now… the new Ford Mondeo. The humble repmobile is the first car new Bond actor Daniel Craig drives in the film, in cinemas on November 16. copied & pasted. go to site below & read full article Bond Film Appearances: Casino Royale, Quantum of Solace Fun Facts: Aston Martin debuted the DBS as part of Daniel Craig’s first appearance as Bond in Casino Royale , which also featured the DB5. Aston Martin has unveiled the new DBS which will be driven by James Bond, the legendary British secret agent, in the next 007 film, "Casino Royale," to be produced by Michael G Wilson and Barbara ... Although the car sustained serious damage in Casino Royale, repairs were made in time for Moonraker. However, the car was once again damaged, this time beyond repair and Bond must have cursed his luck as only 54 blowers were ever made. At the end of the book though he buys a second Bentley, a 1953 Mark VI with an open touring body. Bond agrees to buy the car after a test drive on condition ... Which car does James Bond drive in Casino Royale? I just wanted to know the model and company. Answer Save. 8 Answers. Relevance. Exterminator. Lv 4. 1 decade ago. Favorite Answer. He drives a Morris Minor 1000 cc. 0 1 0. Login to reply the answers Post; Anonymous. 1 decade ago. Aston Martin V12 Vanquish. 0 0 0. Login to reply the answers Post; peregory. Lv 4. 4 years ago ...

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James Bond Shows His Softer Side (Casino Royale Shower ...

These are all of the James Bond vehicles I could find where he used extra gadgets in them. Unfortunately, I didn't have "Tomorrow Never Dies" in my James Bon... James Bond movie clips: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFH8w5zP4HY7c_0SLuyjig6YxsFwzHkQwBUY THE BOND 50 BLUE-RAY BOX SET: http://www.amazon.com/Bond-... I own nothing... 007 Casino Royale battle on airport Casino Royale (2006) 720p Ford Mondeo and James Bond Touching scene from Casino Royale where we get to see Bond's compassionate and loving side. This scene always gets me. © 2016 MGM Some failed attempts on flipping the Casino Royale Aston Martin DBS,

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